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    Hello all! I work with fleet customers nationwide and many of them have questions on CNG. It is truely a hot topic in the fleet world as many companies are concerned about their CO2 output. I hope to pick up some "pointers" from everyday users.
    John

  • #2
    Re: New Member

    NG is basically CH4. A small amount of adultrant gasses make up the final 5% or so. Carbon dioxide is 1 atom to 4 atoms hydrogen. CH4 is the simplest of the alkanes as others have more complex structures and hydrocarbon compounds. During the winter where I am the gas utility uses a more pure mixture of NG as propane, butane and such may condense in the lines.

    NG is actually about 20X less of a greenhouse gas after it is burned.

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    • #3
      Re: New Member

      Originally posted by Amfuel View Post
      NG is basically CH4. A small amount of adultrant gasses make up the final 5% or so. Carbon dioxide is 1 atom to 4 atoms hydrogen. CH4 is the simplest of the alkanes as others have more complex structures and hydrocarbon compounds. During the winter where I am the gas utility uses a more pure mixture of NG as propane, butane and such may condense in the lines.

      NG is actually about 20X less of a greenhouse gas after it is burned.
      We all know what you meant, but just in case someone gets confused: Methane is 1 atom carbon to 4 atoms hydrogen.
      _____________________________________
      '12 Blue Mist Metallic Civic Natural Gas; '03 Galapagos Green Civic GX; '07 Alabaster White Civic GX

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      • #4
        Re: New Member

        Originally posted by John Mack View Post
        Hello all! I work with fleet customers nationwide and many of them have questions on CNG. It is truely a hot topic in the fleet world as many companies are concerned about their CO2 output.
        John
        CO2 using NG as fuel will be about 20% less than using gasoline . This assumes a dedicated engine optimized for cng. A duel fuel engine will still be low on HC and NOX, but will not have much co2 reduction due to lower fuel efficency.

        One of the heavy duty engine manufacturers is makes a variable compression ratio engine (uses an excentric crankshaft bearing set) .
        I think it can be changed while running. It's an old idea , but someone is now making it work on a production engine .This would be the cat's meow for a duel fuel enginge. 9 to 1 on gasoline, crank it up to 12 to 1 on cng.

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