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  • #16
    Turning Poop Into Power Not Pollution, produced by PBS in March 2016 provides up-close tours of Colorado's Greeley (Heartland) and Grand Junction digesters:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASoXPy8RWlQ
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    • #17
      It is a shame they are allowed to burn off so much Natural Gas at the Bakken oil fields. The sat photo shows it compared to major cities at night.
      You do not have permission to view this gallery.
      This gallery has 1 photos.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by johnm View Post
        It is a shame they are allowed to burn off so much Natural Gas at the Bakken oil fields. The sat photo shows it compared to major cities at night.
        They have so much of it that they don't know what to do with it all. They've run out of room to store it.

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        • #19
          Why don't they run generators and put it on the grid? Better than just burning it off!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by johnm View Post
            Why don't they run generators and put it on the grid? Better than just burning it off!
            A lot of our utility power in the US is generated by burning natural gas. Coal is used more though, and they should use more natural gas instead.

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            • #21
              Sewage to methane process to undergo full scale testing in 2017 and will be ready to scale up for putting methane back at pipeline quality according to testing at Argonne.

              https://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenerg...le-natural-gas
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              • #22
                International company BIOFerm provided the biogas processor featured in the 2015 national award-winning digester at the largest dairy in Wisconsin - Rosendale Dairy N8997 County Road M, Pickett, WI:

                http://www.biofermenergy.com/2015-bi...e-biodigester/
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                • #23
                  I attended a bio-fuels meeting at the UW Green Bay last Monday. At the meeting the final speaker approached the EPA regulations. There are so many restrictions laid forth by the EPA with the RFS and RINs it is taking several projects over a year to get permits. The speaker stated that she was only brushing the surface of the regulations to keep the topic within the time frame. (1 hour)

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                  • #24
                    University of California Riverside now hosts a center for applied research into renewable natural gas. It is funded in part by SoCalGas with a matching donation from the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and the National Center for Sustainable Transportation (NCST):

                    http://www.ngvjournal.com/first-rene...ENVIO%20SIMPLE
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                    • #25
                      Stahlbush Island Farms, Corvallis, OR, is an environmentally friendly farm and food processor recognized nationally for its sustainable production of fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes.

                      Stahlbush operates a first-of-its-kind (in North America) Biogas Plant that turns all of the farm agricultural byproducts (corn husks, silage, waste fruits and vegetables, etc.) into electricity. Begun in 2008, the $10M project took 14 months to complete before becoming operational in 2009. Methane from the process powers a 20-cylinder, 2,200hp Caterpillar engine that generates twice as much electricity as Stahlbush Island can consume.

                      It took several growing seasons to completely optimize the digester, explained John Bailey, who says there is a steep learning curve early on for anaerobic digestion (AD). Our digester consumes everything from our corn stalks to blueberries. The continual variations in feedstock create a myriad of challenges for the operators who strive to maximize daily kW output. The engine coolant provides the heat for blanching vegetables before they are frozen. And the engine exhaust passes through a heat exchanger for use in the facility. In the long term, the methane may eventually find a use for farm equipment and trucks.

                      http://www.producegrower.com/article...tion-benefits/


                      http://www.foodengineeringmag.com/ar...h-island-farms


                      http://www.htiwater.com/divisions/in...ead_story.html


                      Powering Stahlbush Island Farms with Produce

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6ZPyedeGcA
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                      • #26
                        Cliff Gladstein for ACTNews March 9 2018 - RINs Explained

                        In a period of relatively low oil and gas prices, the revenue made from the creation and sale of RINs enabled alternative fuel producers, particularly those that produce RNG, to match or beat low fossil fuel prices. RINs also provide developers of RNG, such as dairies and food processors, the much-needed stream of capital necessary to justify investment in the physical plant needed to generate, clean up and inject RNG in to the nation’s natural gas infrastructure.

                        For the last several months there has been downward pressure on the prices of RIN credits. Within hours of the publication of this article, the Trump Administration announced that it was indefinitely canceling the RIN policy meeting between corn and oil states scheduled for March 12th. The importance of RINs and RIN policy to the financial success of renewable fuels cannot be understated.

                        In the absence of an agreement, however, it seems clear that oil industry supporters have achieved, at least temporarily, their objectives of reducing RIN costs to refiners by stoking fear and unease about the future of the RFS.

                        https://www.act-news.com/news/rin-vo...y-uncertainty/
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                        • #27
                          What I am talking about is reversing this idea, it requires very much more holding capacity with much longer turnover times, (the real drawback), but you start out with energy this production as the main goal, not as a byproduct. I am not aware of a single WW plant that is approaching things from this angle yet

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                          • #28
                            Irina Slav for Oilprice.com Aug 19, 2019 - Is Renewable Hydrogen A Threat To Natural Gas?

                            Oilprice.com recently reported on a renewable natural gas project in progress in Vermont, a rare sort of a project that collects methane from manure and other waste. Now, another similar project has been announced—this time in Colorado. Only this one does not collect methane. It produces it from renewable hydrogen.

                            The project is dubbed the first scalable biomethanation reactor system and is the product of a partnership between Southern California Gas Co and a German company, Electrochaea. Here’s how they describe what their facility does:

                            First, renewable electricity, generated by the sun, passes through an electrolyzer where water molecules are split into hydrogen and oxygen, storing the renewable electricity as hydrogen gas. The newly-created green hydrogen is combined with carbon dioxide and piped into the reactor where archaea microorganisms produce renewable natural gas by consuming hydrogen and carbon dioxide and emitting methane.

                            This sounds quite a bit more complicated than the methane collection and processing project touted by its operator, Clean Energy Fuels, as a viable alternative to fossil fuels. It is also uncertain if the biomethanation reactor system would prove commercially viable. Essentially, however, the idea is to store the methane in pipelines to use as power generation fuel at some later point. The methanation reactor, then, is a sort of energy storage facility. When needed, the energy—the methane—is pumped for use in homes, businesses and in transportation.

                            According to the partners, who worked with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, every 10 kWh of power produce 5 to 6 kWh of electricity equivalent in the form of methane. The efficiency rate of the system is 50-60 percent. More importantly, however, it can recycle carbon dioxide from various sources. This includes the anaerobic digesters such as the one Clean Energy Fuels operates in Vermont.

                            https://finance.yahoo.com/news/renew...?.tsrc=applewf
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