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Manheim New England Auction

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  • Manheim New England Auction

    has anyone attended 1 of these auctions? Lots of government cng vehicles for sale.

    http://autoauctions.gsa.gov/index.cfm
    http://www.lifetotes.com

  • #2
    Re: Manheim New England Auction

    Yep--I've been there. GSA auctions are open to everybody---dealers and non-dealers alike. Also, most GSA auctions are on the internet so you don't have to be there to bid. A point of caution, if you don't go the the auction itself, you might be real disappointed with what you bought. The information and history of the car is limited and usually there is only one photo on the internet. Stuff that looks good sometimes isn't and it's usually the internet bidder that gets stuck with the "great deal" because no one at the auction is bidding on the vehicle. With a government auction, you have no recourse if what you buy is junk. There is no test driving, however you can start the vehicle and see if everything works. Most CNG vehicles have no NG in them so it's a crap shoot as to the operation of the system. When it comes to CNG, many of the buyers have no idea of what they are looking at--they want the vehicle but have no intention to run it on CNG or care. I've driven more then one interested buyer away from a car by opening the trunk and saying "wow, look at all the trunk room!" If you are going, you must register first. Go the day before the auction and take a look at all the vehicles you are interested in. Get the auction guide, make notes and set a limit for each vehicle on what you are willing to pay. This is the day to register and verify the requirements for paying for the vehicle. On auction day, get your bidder number and make sure you have cash or a current letter of credit from your bank if you are going to present a check. I usually bring a bank check made out to Manheim for a greater amount then the vehicles you are going to buy. Manheim will cut you a check on the spot for the difference after the sale. Even with the letter from the bank or bank check, the state will take taxes and may require a cash payment for them. If you win a vehicle, the government will cut a title to you on the spot. It will be titled to the name you used when you registered and to no one else. Good luck and good hunting . During the auction, cars will run in sequence based on the car number listed in the guide. If it is a multi-lane auction keep an eye on the number of the cars running in the other lanes so you don't miss something you want. Also, if you are bidding, keep a sharp eye on the TV monitor showing internet bids---make sure you have the attention of the auctioneer or one of his assistants while you are actively bidding. Once, you reach your pre-determined price limit, walk away. If you don't get what you want, there will be other auctions .

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    • #3
      Re: Manheim New England Auction

      "might be real disappointed with what you bought. The information and history of the car is limited and usually there is only one photo on the internet. Stuff that looks good sometimes isn't and it's usually the internet bidder that gets stuck with the "great deal" because no one at the auction is bidding on the vehicle."

      Yup , some have poorly repaired body damage, nothing dangerous , just sloppy.

      "Most CNG vehicles have no NG in them so it's a crap shoot as to the operation of the system. "

      Now at all GSA auctions, they have a disclaimer about alternate fuel systems NOT being guarnteed to function , even at time of sale.

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      • #4
        Re: Manheim New England Auction

        I've even had a small car dealer (mom & pop) attend auction on my behalf (before hand of course to inspect the vehicle) as they know all the tricks for checking for poor body work - - - ie repair of wrecks. Simple trick is magnet to ensure fenders, etc. don't have body putty which doesn't attract magnet.

        Also, one small car dealer had way of just looking at the part numbers on fenders, bumper, hood, etc. and knowing whether they were original parts or replacement.

        In a perfect world, you'd be able to bring portable supply of cng and transfer some cng so you could test the car running on cng. Personally, I think this should be a REQUIREMENT of selling party to have BOTH fuels at least at 1/2 tank so it can be tested.

        Best of luck . . . I've been involved in 3 purchases of cng cars from Ebay where small car dealer first bought the car, then resold on Ebay. All 3 turned out to be near perfect, so no regrets whatsoever.

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