Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Re: Alternatives to Phill?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Re: Alternatives to Phill?

    here are some links I found about home refueling units in EU. Sorry some pages are in German and the English version does not show the product:
    http://apex.eu.com/HomeD/Produkte/Bonsai.htm
    http://www.pressurecontrols.com/
    http://www.gasfill.com/products.htm
    There is one more I found in Austria, offered by local utility company, but I need to dig a little more for it.
    Another one was ment for France (south France) utility customers when they bought a Citroen NGV, The link starts from the France-Gas-Company, but I could not find the actual manufacturer.

  • #2
    Re: Alternatives to Phill?

    Apex is not an alternative: their fast-fill system uses FuelMaker compressors.
    GTC does not have a product, just an empty box (although if you pay him money he will gladly accept it).
    I think Gasfill gave up.
    There are a few more companies that are trying something, but none seem to have a marketable product available.
    A local utility in Austria sells the Phill (not sure if you mean that one).
    GasdeFrance supplied the Phill in France.
    Last edited by Gerben; 04-10-2009, 04:28 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Alternatives to Phill?

      Originally posted by Gerben View Post
      Apex ... uses FuelMaker compressors.
      Austria sells the Phill.
      GasdeFrance supplied the Phill in France.
      doh!
      1234567890


      ?Innovation is driven by having access to things.? -- Gleb Budman, CEO of backblaze.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Alternatives to Phill?

        From contacts I've tried making with England, Italy & Netherlands, there are NO competitors to Phill or Fuelmaker larger products - - - only GasFill (England) and GasAt Home (Netherlands) made actual products but never sold worldwide (and now appear to not be selling anything - - at least that I can determine here in USA). Italy has strong cng movement, but appears they don't need home VRA as public cng refueling takes care of their need.

        Phill really became the "little engine that could" . . . . actually was a worldwide leader with over 2,000 sold units in Europe recently. Potential sales of Phill in China would dwarf those 2K sold in Europe.

        Thus, I'm COUNTING ON / TRUSTING . . . that this latest maneuver by Honda was intentional carnage for the betterment of home cng refueling in future. Only history will prove this out or not.

        The world obviously NEEDS a world-wide, mass produced (ie reasonably priced), reliable VRA like the Phill and fmq2-36 Fuelmaker. Field serviceable units will be key to the future, so that dealer network will continue, and customers can get service and reasonable installs.

        However, in meantime MANY Americans, Canadians, and others Absolutely Need Assurances that parts will continue to be made for FM4's, fmq2-36 and Phill units already in service.

        For "Next Gen Phill" . . . let's hope that the .5 gge/hr barrier can be bumped to 1 gge, so maybe the old Arnold Schwarzenegger phrase "pump me up" can be implemented for the new PhillMAX. Also, need worldwide standard 3,600 psi and safety standards for tanks and installs.
        Last edited by cngacrossusa; 04-12-2009, 09:57 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Alternatives to Phill?

          Hi Everyone,

          as the social media rapresentative at gasfill, I am here to say that gasfill is still active. We are in the process of securing a partner who will help take our HRA to market. The U.S is a market which we will be trying to get into. As I just joined the forum I cannot prost any thread specific to our product, but please visit our social pages which we have just opened up

          https://www.facebook.com/gasfillhome
          twitter @gasfill

          Kind Regards
          gasfill

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Alternatives to Phill?

            reading through it said 4000 hours for the compressor and 12000 for the whole unit and no oil so just a rerun of phil is my thoughts. of course you all know I hate oilless compressors. I am just slightly jaded Lol If you are looking for partners or in r+d soon to ship and a dozen other storys IT IS VAPORWARE!!!!!!!!!!!!! if I cant call and have one delivered and set up and pumping in a week or two IT IS VAPORWARE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! come on folks lets get off our( something I cant say here for fear being baned) and come up with a good stout small 2ggehr compressor with oil in it so it can last the lifettime of its owner that you dont have to be a tecky to own.it.
            Last edited by cowboy; 02-22-2014, 07:38 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Alternatives to Phill?

              The issues with oil filled HRA in my opinion is the regular maintenance schedule. And for us in colder climates is the need for a crank case heater to keep the oil warm enough to circulate properly. An added expense to operation. The Phill (and Q series) were designed in Canada and have an operating temperature range of -40dF and +113dF without an additional heat source providing climate control. Of course the Phill is certified to be operated indoors. This is really a nice feature for colder climates as parking outdoors in winter is less than optimal. (to say the least)

              The Phill is now field serviceable (at least to a certain extent - then it needs to be taken to a shop) There is only one moving part other than a couple solenoid valves and fan. That is the compression module. When I change a compression module I don't even take the machine off the wall. A module will run an average of 6,000 hours. I've seen one last 11,000. That customer now has over 16,000 on his machine. The policy of sending the unit in for rebuild was the old Fuel Maker and has been abandoned and field service and parts availability implemented by BRC.

              There is a lot of criticism of the Phill. There are a lot of Phill units in the US and international market. The satisfied vast majority are the silent ones.

              As for oil free technology. I used to do industrial maintenance in a piston factory. (Iron/aluminum foundry/machine shop) The metallurgy is quite sufficient to provide longevity of the products. Taking duds apart I can see the alloys that are involved and that provides me with the assurance of quality.

              Tolerances are another subject entirely. I don't care what brand, if the tolerance is not proper the end use suffers. The northern Italians (BRC Fuel Maker) and Germans (Bauer compressors) have a reputation of quality as can be observed in other products from the area. (cars, etc) I'll throw out the difference between a BMW and say a Chevy as an example.

              As a general rule - You get what you pay for.

              Comment

              Working...
              X