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  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    On this subject I know very little. I do know that SNO-Motion now “GO natural” is in negotiations with a company out of Colorado to buy the rights for converting diesel engines to a 70% CNG, 30% diesel mix. No drilling or engine swap needed. If this works out to be true, I would say go with that. It sounds cheaper than a whole engine swap, or down time from shipping the engine out to be done.

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  • Gabby
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    Which one of you gents can answer a question about Heavy Duty engine in trucks that can be converted with the blessings of the EPA? And yes by a certified shop! Is there a list? Like Mercedes, Cummins, John Deere.

    Reason: I get asked about this about twice a week as I am doing research for myself and my community.

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  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    As of right now I am not a certified tech, however I do plan on taking the tests if I stay in my current employment. I refuse to “rent” my skills, by this I mean that just because you can fix it does not mean you know why or how it works. I value ASE certifications and find them to be a good tool in hiring techs.

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  • Highmarker
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    knowplus1,

    Welcome to cngchat. I understand that you have alot of experience under your belt. But back to Curtis's question: Are you an ASE certified CNG tech?

    Leave a comment:


  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    keep in mind what the o2 sensor is reading. You are interested in what is NOT burning. The main thing to remember is that the efficiency of the engine is balanced with longevity of the engine and emissions components. To rich and the fuel economy and catalyst suffers, to lean and economy goes up to a point, then drivability declines in misfires and engine damage. It’s the unburned fuel you want to balance. This said, your readings are going to be close to the same voltage, 900 to 100. Rich lean respectively. Does this help?

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  • karlhafen
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    Please explain what the 02 voltages should look like. The stoichiometric air-fuel ratios of cng and gasoline are different (17.2:1 vs 14.7:1). Should the o2 be reading slightly lean when on cng?

    I have noticed proper grammar is a use it or lose it kind of thing. As you can tell it's been a long time since I've used it.

    Leave a comment:


  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    wrenchmonkey, funny you should mention this. I do have a problem with grammar. among spelling and Egyptology. we all have our gifts, mine is not spelling or grammar. however I can assure you that I am no bumpkin. with over eleven years of experience and over 200 credit hours of higher education with over a B average, I feel confident in trying to share my experience with anyone who is interested.

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  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    bakarama, with all respect, thank you for this forum. I can appreciate your concern that I might be trying to wedge myself into this community, however I have no intention to step on any toes or cause conflict of any type. my interest in this forum is purely to share information and to gain info that I don't have. I know that I don't know everything and I hope you don't think that I am trying to pass myself off as "all knowing" in this field. I do not intend to have a one way relationship, I hope I can learn from you as well.
    Last edited by knowplus1; 07-27-2008, 07:36 PM.

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  • wrenchmonkey
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    So you're just going to ignore questions regarding your experience? Based on your grammar, I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess you don't have a degree of any sort...

    What's your background, sir?

    EDIT: Posted at the same time as your post...

    Leave a comment:


  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    Sure! I have been working on gasoline vehicles and engines since 1996, and I have a degree in heavy duty mechanics from SLCC, graduated with high honors. my experience spans many engine types including, sterling cycle, diesel, spark ignition internal combustion, turbine and others for the last six years I have been focused on diagnostics for gasoline and CNG. I have experience with ECO systems, Bay tech, Mogas, Impco, Tartarini and others. I do have some propane experience, but limited to mixers and regulators.

    Leave a comment:


  • knowplus1
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    as an auto tech you can expect more and more cng cars every day, as far as "tune up" info i will need more specific info. spark plug gap will most mostly be the same as oem. some experimentation has resulted in better performance, however for the most part you can set them to stock. if you do not have emissions in your aria your main concern for your customers will be performance. with this in mind you will want to adjust the system to run as well as possible without burning to rich or to lean. (to rich will burn up catalyst) (to lean will cause harmful backfires) the 4 gas is a great idea! I like the way your thinking. until you get it though you can use the o2 sensor to set idle and to check high speed mixture control. for the best info on what emissions will look like you can look at hc the same as gas, (unburned fuel is the same as gas). co (carbon monoxide) will be different. I am not clear on what the limits are specifically, the other experts will have this information.

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  • karlhafen
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    OK, I'll go first. I work as an auto tech. I am starting to see CNG vehicles almost daily. This week 2 f150s, an econoline,and a gx. We do not do conversions but with all the converting going on I am sure I will some day be asked to "tune" someones conversion. (assume legal conversion on an older vehicle). I do not have a gas analyzer (we do not have emission tests in our area). but I am thinking about getting a used 4 gas. My question is What would good/bad readings look like for cng.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    Chad, your profile shows you as a mechanic in Utah. Are you a certified cng tech?

    Leave a comment:


  • freedml
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    If you can find any errors in the technical discussions, by all means post corrections. I don't think you'll find many...

    Leave a comment:


  • bakaroma
    replied
    Re: questions answered

    knowplus1, I am not sure how to understand your post. Hopefully you know since this is a long existing forum there are already many experts within all of the cng realms from sales, to tech, to historical issues. Everyone brings ideas and the more the marrier. Just note you are among friends and fellow experts of which I am not one.

    Leave a comment:

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