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  • Clean Air Act

    I found this very Interesting, Jim

    Clean Air Act

    SEC. 247. VEHICLE CONVERSIONS.
    (a) Conversion of Existing and New Conventional Vehicles to Clean-Fuel Vehicles.- The requirements of section 246 may be met through the conversion of existing or new gasoline or diesel-powered vehicles to clean-fuel vehicles which comply with the applicable requirements of that section. For purposes of such provisions the conversion of a vehicle to clean fuel vehicle shall be treated as the purchase of a clean fuel vehicle. Nothing in this part shall be construed to provide that any covered fleetoperator subject to fleet vehicle purchase requirements undersection 246 shall be required to convert existing or new gasoline or diesel-powered vehicles to clean-fuel vehicles or to purchase converted vehicles.

    (b) Regulations.- The Administrator shall, within 24 months after the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, consistent with the requirements of this title applicable to new vehicles, promulgate regulations governing conversions of conventional vehicles to clean-fuel vehicles. Such regulations shall establish criteria for such conversions which will ensure that a converted vehicle will comply with the standards applicable under this part to clean-fuel vehicles. Such regulations shall provide for the application to such conversions of the same provisions of this title (including provisions relating to administration enforcement) as are applicable to
    standards under section 242, 243, 244, and 245, except that in the case of conversions the Administrator may modify the applicable regulations implementing such provisions as the Administrator deems necessary to implement this part.

    (c) Enforcement.- Any person who converts conventional vehicles to clean fuel vehicles pursuant to subsection (b), shall be considered a manufacturer for purposes of sections 206 and 207 and related enforcement provisions. Nothing in the preceding
    sentence shall require a person who performs such conversions to warrant any part or operation of a vehicle other than as required under this part. Nothing in this paragraph shall limit the applicability of any other warranty to unrelated parts or operations.

    (d) Tampering.- The conversion from a vehicle capable of operating on gasoline or diesel fuel only to a clean-fuel vehicle shall not be considered a violation of section 203(a)(3) if such conversion complies with the regulations promulgated under subsection (b).

    (e) Safety.- The Secretary of Transportation shall, if necessary, promulgate rules under applicable motor vehicle laws regarding the safety of vehicles converted from existing and new vehicles to clean-fuel vehicles.
    [42 U.S.C. 7587]
    Jim Younkin
    www.younkincng.com

  • #2
    Re: Clean Air Act

    Was this federal or state?
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_4586_1441434431016_578[/ATTACH]

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    • #3
      Re: Clean Air Act

      Regardless I'd print a copy of that sucker and keep it in my glovebox if it applies.

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      • #4
        Re: Clean Air Act

        Originally posted by Curtis View Post
        Was this federal or state?
        All law that is U.S.C. is United States Code and as such, Federal law.

        Check this out:

        http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/ht...2----000-.html

        Originally posted by U.S.C. TITLE 42 > CHAPTER 85 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part A > ยง 7522 Prohibited acts
        No action with respect to any device or element of design referred to in paragraph (3) shall be treated as a prohibited act under that paragraph if the action is for the purpose of a conversion of a motor vehicle for use of a clean alternative fuel (as defined in this subchapter) and if such vehicle complies with the applicable standard under section 7521 of this title when operating on such fuel, and if in the case of a clean alternative fuel vehicle (as defined by rule by the Administrator), the device or element is replaced upon completion of the conversion procedure and such action results in proper functioning of the device or element when the motor vehicle operates on conventional fuel.
        Now to break it down:

        Originally posted by U.S.C.
        ... referred to in paragraph (3)
        Paragraph (3) of this section basically say's that is prohibited
        for any person to remove or render inoperative any device or element of design installed on or in a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine in compliance with regulations under this subchapter
        "this subchapter" is refering to Subchapter II of Chapter 85 of Title 42.

        Subchapter II's title is: Emission Standards for Moving Sources.

        So it would seem that if a car complies with section 7521 whilst operating on a clean alternative fuel, and everything works correctly on conventional fuel, it is not a prohibited act. What makes it all sticky is that Section 7521's title is: Emission standards for new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines. I have not found anything addtional that speaks to aftermarket conversions/regulations and, by extension, the EPA cert.

        The information posted by younkin is tied back to provisions for fleets and not privately owned means of transportation. In all of the most seriously polluted ozone and CO nonattainment areas, centrally fueled fleets of 10 or more passenger cars and light-duty trucks must purchase at least 30% clean-fuel vehicles when they add new vehicles to existing fleets, starting in 1999. As posted, Section 247 allows for fleets to meet this mandate by conversions.
        Last edited by jblue; 06-04-2008, 05:51 PM.


        ?Innovation is driven by having access to things.? -- Gleb Budman, CEO of backblaze.com

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        • #5
          Re: Clean Air Act

          This posted form this ural

          http://www.usealtfuels.com/epa.htm

          Five years after the institution of EPACT, the government issued an Addendum to Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum 1A, commonly known as Memo 1A. Originally, some AFV's actually increased the emissions on cars. This Addendum to Memo 1A outlined three options to regulate the converting of vehicles to alternative fuels. Options 1 and 2 call for a certification of conformity by the EPA or equivalent on all converted vehicles. Due to the lack of EPA certified products, Option 3 was developed and only required the manufacturer to test to see that the alternative fuel conversion system didn't deteriorate the vehicle's original emissions. This is known as EPA compliance, but falls vastly short of EPA certification. The results of "Option 3" are exactly what the original act intended to avoid, products that end up decreasing the vehicle's performance but not its emissions

          If you are the person converting a car to Natural gas you are considered the manufacturer.

          Can we read this as the person converting a car to an alternative fuel may test the car to see if the emissions have been effected? So why would you need a certified kit if you could prove you had not effected the emissions of the car? Is this what is meant by some converters as Having or getting a Calibration?

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          • #6
            Re: Clean Air Act

            Jblue stated:
            "The information posted by younkin is tied back to provisions for fleets and not privately owned means of transportation. In all of the most seriously polluted ozone and CO nonattainment areas, centrally fueled fleets of 10 or more passenger cars and light-duty trucks must purchase at least 30% clean-fuel vehicles when they add new vehicles to existing fleets, starting in 1999. As posted, Section 247 allows for fleets to meet this mandate by conversions."

            Does this mean that private owners are under no regulations or mandates concerning CNG Conversions? JIm
            Jim Younkin
            www.younkincng.com

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            • #7
              Re: Clean Air Act

              It would seem that that question answers itself. A pvt party does not meet the definition of a fleet, and as mentioned above, the regulation is apparently for manufacturers of "new" vehicles, even though the party doing the conversion is considered "the manufacturer". It would seem to apply to John's project with the Impala if the vehicles being converted are "new".
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_4586_1441434431016_578[/ATTACH]

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