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Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

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  • Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

    Questar in Utah has low NG prices because years ago it included a lot of NG production in its regulated utility rate base. So that gas supply is not at market--Questar makes a regulated return based on its actual production costs.

    I'm very interested in knowing what other states have similar low-cost natural gas utility supplies. I can't find national rate surveys on Google--any leads appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

    I think that information would be classified by the utilities. They wouldn't want the public to know that.

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    • #3
      Re: Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

      The situation is similar in Oklahoma. CNG has been $0.909/gge since 11/01/07 and the price stays the same until November 1 each year (price from 11/01/06 to 10/31/07 was $0.949/gge). Oklahoma Natural Gas (ONG) is regulated by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

      Here is a recent article on CNNMoney that references cheap CNG costs in Oklahoma:

      http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/...5ff293b36b.htm

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      • #4
        Re: Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

        Originally posted by Maverick1966 View Post
        Questar in Utah has low NG prices because years ago it included a lot of NG production in its regulated utility rate base. So that gas supply is not at market--Questar makes a regulated return based on its actual production costs.

        I'm very interested in knowing what other states have similar low-cost natural gas utility supplies. I can't find national rate surveys on Google--any leads appreciated.

        http://www.cngprices.com is a good place to check pump prices across the US, Canada, and Europe

        Just plug in a zip code and it will zoom in on an area, or you can zoom out and see it all


        And what you said about Questar, I heard, that part of the reason CNG is so cheap in Utah is because the state subsidizes around $.50 per GGE for the stuff sold at the pump as an incentive for the people to get into CNG since we need cleaner air in the valley BAD. I also heard that you don't get that subsidy if you pump from your home filling station (making the price more like around $1.15 /GGE if you use your own). Now I don't know how true any of this is. As far as I'm concerned, anything I hear through the grape vine is nothing until I prove it to be fact. If it is true though, I wonder if you could just prove how much GGE's of CNG you pump from home into your vehicle (by some in-line meter to measure it), and somehow get refunded that subsidy later?

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        • #5
          Re: Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

          Originally posted by josch View Post
          And what you said about Questar, I heard, that part of the reason CNG is so cheap in Utah is because the state subsidizes around $.50 per GGE for the stuff sold at the pump as an incentive for the people to get into CNG since we need cleaner air in the valley BAD. I also heard that you don't get that subsidy if you pump from your home filling station (making the price more like around $1.15 /GGE if you use your own). Now I don't know how true any of this is. As far as I'm concerned, anything I hear through the grape vine is nothing until I prove it to be fact. If it is true though, I wonder if you could just prove how much GGE's of CNG you pump from home into your vehicle (by some in-line meter to measure it), and somehow get refunded that subsidy later?
          It is a federal excise tax, not state - (http://www.eere.energy.gov/afdc/prog...php/afdc/319/0)
          Devin

          http://www.cnginfoguide.com

          http://feedproxy.google.com/CngInformationGuide
          http://feedproxy.google.com/CngForSale

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          • #6
            Re: Areas with Low Natural Gas Costs

            Home refueling is around 85 cents in Utah, and not too much higher around the country. Just look at your home fuel bill to find out what you are paying per therm, and multiply by 1.25 to get the gasoline gallon equivalent, then add on a few cents for the electricity to compress it.

            http://www.cngchat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1905

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