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  • Jackson Racing GX supercharger

    Hi All:

    I searched for supercharger and only came up with three hits, none in the title. So, with the Admins approval, I'm starting a new thread.

    Curtis wrote about Jackson Racing, http://www.jacksonracing.com/production.htm, so if anyone has any info on the GX Supercharger, please add it to this post.

    ch4
    Must be able to follow instructions well but think abstractly to resolve problems.
    CH

  • #2
    Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

    I'll try and condense the supercharger issue here for those that want to follow it, and Oscar, feel free to jump in and give the group an update as well.

    Oscar contacted me with the intent of doing a supercharger for the Civic Hybrid. I turned him onto the idea of doing it for the GX as well... or instead of...

    He, like most others, was unaware of the GX and, as he learned more, decided that this was a project worth looking into. Oscar is in charge of finding new projects for the company these days.

    He came up and spent a few hours with me, driving, examining the engine compartment layout, and talking with my techs. The outcome was that he was excited about the prospects of supercharging the GX. He seemed to think that the supercharger would push the mild mannered GX up to about 160hp, and increase the cruising gas mileage up by 2-4 mpg, which surprised me.

    The company was working on kits for the Civic Si and S-2000 cars at the time and our little upgrade would have to wait until possibly late Spring to be started. From what the calander tells me, it's almost that time.

    Since our original meeting we have communicated by way of chats Private Messenger, and he's assured me that the project is still on track. What excited him most I think was that he felt that the kit could be produced with almost all "off the shelf" items and would be easy enough to manufacture.

    My hope is that he will have a working unit by the time of the Cruise-In/Expo and have something for all of you coming to the event to drool over. So who among you would spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $3000 to make your mild mannered GX into a tire spinning fun machine?
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    • #3
      Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

      Wow! 76 views in one week.

      I think we have some interest here...

      ch4
      Almost by definition, if it was XML, it was good.
      CH

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      • #4
        Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

        i guess that would seriously void the warranty!! But, what fun!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

          The performance potential of CNG is huge. It is between 120-130 octane and in turbocharged applications would be awesome. I hope to do some experimenting with the CNG in performance applications.

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          • #6
            Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

            Yeah I think a turbo would be better than a supercharger because of the octane
            rating too.

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            • #7
              Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

              Being only slightly above dangerous in mechanical abilities, maybe some of you tech types with high-performance backgrounds can answer me this...

              On a converted gasoline car with 8.5:1-9.5:1 compression, a supercharger/turbo is going to raise the compression ratio's and increase performance, if I understand the mechanics of the situation.

              Now, what about a dedicated vehicle that is already at 12.5:1, like the GX? Would you need to lower the compression first? Wouldn't there be problems with engine wear or performance if you got to around 15:1 or higher?
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              • #8
                Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

                I know that for a supercharger/turbo you should run low compression like 8:1. If the GX is 12.5:1, it's tougher on the engine. I wouldn't change to a higher compression like 15:1. You could lower the ratio buy purchasing new rods and pistons, and it would last longer, but that's a lot of money.

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                • #9
                  Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

                  With a 12.5:1 compression ratio and cast pistons, you would want to keep the boost levels reasonable. However, CNG is 120-130 octane. In my ranger I have 8.5:1 compression and have engine destroying detonation at 18-20 psi on 91 octane. I haven't ever heard of race fuel above 118 octane and many drag racing cars run boost in excess of 28 psi.
                  From what I have gathered, CNG motors should have compression anywhere from 12:1 up to 15:1. If you are on the lower end of the spectrum you really ought to be able to run a lot of boost, but on a brand new GX I wouldn't.
                  Detonation is what destroys engines fast and octane is a measure of resistance to detonation. My guess is that a motor set up for gasoline (9:1-10:1) could take as much boost as any single turbo could throw at it and not detonate. However, the added stress of high cylinder pressures, increased power output and high exhaust gas temperatures could over time prove fatal to the valves and cast pistons.
                  I would like to do some testing and see if my ideas have any truth in them or if I am just telling myself that that is the way it should be.

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                  • #10
                    Jackson Racing GX supercharger

                    Curtis,
                    I wanted to know if the kit was out yet?
                    How does it improve mileage?

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                    • #11
                      Re: What's the deal with the Jackson Supercharger?

                      Your post spurred me to call and email Oscar Jackson. It appears that he's not in today, so I left messages for him to call me. He travels around quite a bit and doesn't have his hands on the wheel of the company like he did back in the day. Now he's the one that finds all the interesting projects to tackle, like this one.

                      I'll let you know if and when he responds.
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                      • #12
                        Re: What's the deal with the Jackson Supercharger?

                        We've also a thread here:
                        http://www.cngchat.com/forum/showthr...t=supercharger

                        with 190 reads
                        CH

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                        • #13
                          Re: What's the deal with the Jackson Supercharger?

                          I got an email from Oscar today and here is the reply I got:

                          Curtis,

                          Good to hear from you. As I said last time we spoke, I won't be supercharging a GX Civic until I buy one. And when I buy one you will be the first to know. Because I won't buy one from anyone but you! You are the Man!

                          The huge request for Civic Si, S2000, and Fit superchargers must be dealt with before I can contemplate supercharging the GX. Plus the R&D for the GX will probably take over a year and be extremely expensive. And God only knows if we will be able to "crack" the ECU so that we have complete control of the ECU. So there is a considerable amount of new science that must go into a project of this magnitude. And with our young company we must fill the largest demand and the grab the "lowest hanging fruit" first so that we can afford to do the R&D required for such a new technology. I am still extremely interested in the GX but it has to make good business sense for us from a cash flow perspective. If you are gaining so many new members to CNGCHAT it won't be long until there IS a good business reason to move forward with a supercharger for the GX. It is absolutely on my radar screen.

                          I will try to make it out to your event but I will be in a supercharged Fit, S2000, or Civic Si at this point. It will give me the opportunity to talk to and see as many GX customers as possible. This type of "one on one" can certainly sway my ideas for a next project.

                          Have a great day. BTW, I received your newsletter last week. It was very informative. Keep up the good work.

                          It may not be the answer you were looking for, but at least you know where we stand.
                          Curtis
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                          • #14
                            Re: Jackson Racing GX Supercharger

                            Originally posted by Curtis View Post
                            Being only slightly above dangerous in mechanical abilities, maybe some of you tech types with high-performance backgrounds can answer me this...

                            On a converted gasoline car with 8.5:1-9.5:1 compression, a supercharger/turbo is going to raise the compression ratio's and increase performance, if I understand the mechanics of the situation.

                            Now, what about a dedicated vehicle that is already at 12.5:1, like the GX? Would you need to lower the compression first? Wouldn't there be problems with engine wear or performance if you got to around 15:1 or higher?

                            I've had 6 turbochargers on diesel trucks and 1 supercharger, on an F-150 Harley edition. I'm not an expert though, but believe the compression ratio doesn't change by adding a turbocharger or turbo. Those ratios are a fixed function of the mechanical movement of the piston (distance traveled) in relation with how close the piston gets to the head when at the top of the stroke. "Charging" through either method raises fuel/air density. A "charged" (super or turbo) engine can thus have the same manifold pressure at very high altitude that a regular engine has at sea level, and much higher in any equal condition. Turbo-charged airplanes I used to fly were able to maintain sea-level power up to about 10,000 feet, though wing lift was less. Though the ratio doesn't change, you start with more air/fuel packed in, hence more is compressed, resulting in more power AND more STRESS on the components. That is why the ECU needs to be accessed, to monitor conditions and adapt to them as needed (such as by opening the wastegate), or the engine or tranny can be toasted.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Jackson Racing GX supercharger

                              Not really true. The mechanical displacement does not change, but the effective displacement does change as you force more fuel/air into the combustion chamber; it increases peak head pressures. Adding forced induction is a way to compensate for not changing the motor to higher displacement- a way to burn more fuel and get more power.

                              It is the amount of compressed air and fuel in the combustion chamber, heat, and the burn rate of fuels that effects detonation dangers.

                              FWIW, Most turbocharged aircraft are either normalized to keep the boost the same at different altitudes or use larger turbochargers to limit overspeeding under constant load profiles. Automotive turbos do NOT work well at full load for long.

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