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bifuel chevy s10

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  • bifuel chevy s10

    does anyone know much about this vehicle? I've seen a few for sale that are usually model years right around the year 2000. it appears to be a certified EPA conversion but not a factory conversion (please correct me if this is wrong). does anyone know how reliable the cng system on this is and how easy it would be to obtain replacement cng parts if needed? I was hoping the cng parts of the bifuel cavalier (made around the same time) would be compatible with the s10 but I am thinking that's probably not the case. which gives me concern that parts might be more difficult to obtain. I'm look for a small bifuel truck with either a factory conversion or EPA certified conversion.

    thanks

    blyth

    kaysville, UT

  • #2
    Re: bifuel chevy s10

    I wouldnt mess with anything that old. The technology is so much better now... you'd likely never find parts for it anyway. Youre in utah so just convert whatever you want..

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    • #3
      Re: bifuel chevy s10

      The s-10 bi-fuel , IIRC, was an Impco system on the 4.3l v-6. Kind of thirsty. The bi-fuel Cavaliers were sold by gm, with the quantum engineered system installed. Abouth the only thing in common was the impco low cost, high pressure regulator. ECOFUEL http://www.ecofuel.com/default.aspx has or had a few epa approved conversion for ford rangers, not sure about other small trucks. I don't think any of the ecofuel systems were c.a.r.b. approved. The closest think you can find is a few new 2012 still sitting at the dealer dedicated cng Ford Transit connect mini vans. They are aftermarket, not oem ford.
      Last edited by Lakewood90712; 07-03-2014, 08:16 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: bifuel chevy s10

        a good friend of mine has one of the s10s bi fuel . it just runs and runs dont know about mpg as he is well gas. he drives 110 miles a day to work he bought it from a oil co for a 100 dollars with a bad alternator and put one on and has drove it for about 3 years now kinda like that stupid rabbit just keeps going and going. he soon will be riding just the motor as the truck is about to fall apart around the motor 190000 plus miles

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        • #5
          Re: bifuel chevy s10

          I wonder how big of tank I could fit in the bifuel s10. any ideas? I think I would actually like 2 tanks (unless I could have one massive tank....like a 20 plus gge tank), but I don't want to weight it down to much (and kill the mpg) on a continuous basis. what would be ideal for me is to have a setup in the back of the truck for 2 or 3 tanks. then I could buy 3 tanks but only have one mounted and bolted down unless I am doing a long trip and need the extra tanks. then I would bolt bolt down the extra tanks only when I need them for the long trip. I think the bed is probably at least 60 inches wide in the s10 (my 2001 nissan frontier 4 cylinder 2wd has a bed width of 61 inches). I was considering getting a newer civic gx (2006 or newer) as I drive 45K to 55k miles/yr and could save major money each year with cheaper fuel. but they are very pricey (a 2006-2008 with 100K miles will still probably cost me close to 9K). and I'm not to excited to have one of those unless the engine block has already burst and been replaced. I drive all over the western U.S. and I wouldn't want to be out in the middle of nowhere and have the engine block crack on me. if I didn't travel and drove mostly locally where I live (utah), then I wouldn't care as much. an s10 (even with 50 or 60K miles would be much cheaper...although my mpg would probably only be half that of the newer civic gx's). but I would also have some extra money if I bought the s10 and I could buy a home refueling unit (I wouldn't have that option at this time if I bought a newer civic gx).

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          • #6
            Re: bifuel chevy s10

            It's not really practical to be removing and re-installing cng cylinders. Install and leave them installed. You would be lucky to get 18 mpg highway real world on a bi-fuel v-6 s10., and 500# of cyinders on a truck is not going to make much diff. in mpg..........a used fmq home fuel unit is going to be at least $5,000 and a new one is about $8,000...............Most of the Honda block failures were on 08 and 09 models, both gasoline and cng civics. Usually showed up before 60,000 miles , if it was going to fail.

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            • #7
              Re: bifuel chevy s10

              just mount your ferry tanks on a skid and have holes drilled to your frame then when you go on a trip just set them in and bolt them down hook up a parflex hose and you are off. I have found that a hydraulic quick connect works well you will need a bleeder to release the pressure in the hose to hook it up or unhook it.

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              • #8
                Re: bifuel chevy s10

                just mount your ferry tanks on a skid and have holes drilled to your frame.

                what is a skid? have you did that yourself? I would love to see a picture if you have. I'll have to google SKID and see if I can get a better idea of what your talking about.

                yes, it would be kind of a pain to hook and unhook an extra tank. but I would probably only do it 3 or 4X per year.

                if I had to do it every other week, then I would just mount both tanks and leave them in their permanantly. but I figure
                a good size type 4 tank (say 13 to 15 gge range) probably weighs 150 pounds empty and closer to 200 full. that's probably enough extra weight to wipe out 2 mpg or more. I thought the rule of thumb was for every 100 lbs in weight you add, you lose 1 mpg.

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                • #9
                  Re: bifuel chevy s10

                  OH, with needing a long range on cng, I figure installing extra tanks in the bed of a truck would be much cheaper than installing them in the trunk of a car (I just figure it would be much easier and a lot less time consuming for whomever does it). I would probably pay a cng shop to do it (or at least connect the 2 tanks and make sure there are no leaks). plus, there isn't much room in any trunk of a dedicated cng or bifuel cng vehicle based on the pictures I have seen.

                  I would love a 4 cylinder truck with a EPA certified kit installed but I don't know that there are any that pop up for sale out there. and I aint about to pay whatever amount it is (probably like 10K) to have a EPA certified CNG kit installed on a gas powered 4 cylinder truck.

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                  • #10
                    Re: bifuel chevy s10

                    "I thought the rule of thumb was for every 100 lbs in weight you add, you lose 1 mpg."

                    That may be true for a small under-powered vehicle , like an old air cooled vw beetle , getting 25 mpg with a 500# total intended load, including the driver and fuel, not intended to carry much of a load . It has no relation to an already overpowered truck, intended to carry over 1,000 pounds, and haul a trailer too. If that were the case, a truck getting 15 mpg in the city would get 5 mpg with a 1,000# load in the bed. I don't think you would see a difference in mpg with 500# load vs. an empty truck.

                    Many ,many years ago , I had a 1973 Datsun pickup truck. My first truck . 4 cyl, 4 speed stick. It got about 18 mpg loaded or unloaded. And oh, Drum brakes all around, a real treat in wet weather driving thru puddles.

                    P.S. on the bifuel s-10 , www.cngutah.com has sold maybe a dozen or so over the last few years. his website doesn't show any in inventory , but give him a call , and he will have a lot of info.
                    Last edited by Lakewood90712; 07-06-2014, 12:37 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: bifuel chevy s10

                      If your choice is between a gx or v-6 s-10, The gx , will use about half the fuel. Limit the GX to trips of about 200 miles. The useable gge is about 6.5 gge of the total 8. At 33 mpg that is about 200 miles or so........... My biggest fill up ever at a station was 7.2 gge when being towed in after running out.......Use a gasoline vehicle for longer trips, either a second vehicle , or rental car. I don't recommend an in trunk 2nd tank in the gx. 4gge is about the largest that some have done. That area of the car is also intended for crush space in a severe rear impact. If you have easy access to public fueling stations at under $2 per gge for cng , that is not a bad deal.

                      The gx was intended for fleets, with return to base everyday, as an alternative fuel choice for environmental reasons. At $6700 over a civic LX when purchased new, the payback on fuel savings is long. So you save maybe 7 cents per mile vs. gasoline ? that is a small part of the overall cost per mile of vehicle operation.

                      The advantage with cng trucks, is purely fuel cost on vehicles with poor fuel mileage. The worse the mileage on gasoline, the more you save with cng. The payback is a lot quicker.

                      Just my 2 cents worth , been in cng for 12+ years. Put 30,000 on a "00 crown vic, , 140,000 on a 01 gx , 65,000 on a 08 gx. and 35,000 on an 03 bi-fuel Cavalier.
                      Last edited by Lakewood90712; 07-06-2014, 12:08 PM.

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