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  • filter and seafoam

    I have heard that while changing your coalescent filter it is recommended to fill the filter cap with sea foam and run the truck for 30 to 40 miles and then change the filter. this is supposed to help clean and lubricate the compuvalve and other cng elements, what opinions do you guys have on this?

    i have a f150 bifuel

  • #2
    Re: filter and seafoam

    Expert on CNG here in Oklahoma has prior post on Sea Foam and strongly recommends it. See Tom of Tulsa Gas Tech's post at:
    http://cngchat.com/forum/showthread....highlight=foam

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    • #3
      Re: filter and seafoam

      I know that Ford PM-5 is recommended on dedicated CNG, only as a last resort on bi-fuel because of compuvalve o-rings. But after the seafoam or PM-5 flush you should run Isopropanol (alcohol) through the lines to clean any remaining injector cleaner off of the O-rings. You also don;t need to drive for very long, just fill the filter bowl with the alcohol and run for 5 minutes or so. Oh yea, very important... you need very highly concentrated Isopropanol. The rubbing alcohol form the store is only about 70%, you need more like 96-99%. You can buy this at a hardware store paint department or a commercial printing supplier (ie Kelly paper)

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      • #4
        Re: filter and seafoam

        I did my 2001 bi-fuel Ford F150 with seafoam and had a problem for a while after. It was like the seafoam stopped the injectors up or something. The best way to describe it was after I get up to speed (65) and let of the gas it would jerk. This went on for quite a while,like 2 months. I did not follow up with the alcohol treatment right after. After I seem a post here recommending the alcohol I tried it. Seemed to help some but still had the jerk. Treated it several more times with the alcohol and it did finally go away. I seafoam all my cars/trucks and the stuff works great. This was the first time I did it on a nat. gas truck and it was driving great before I did it. It only had around 17k miles when I did the seafoam..

        Now since it has gotten colder my truck doesn't want to start on natural gas. It will start fine on regular gas and after I run it a while I can turn it off and it will start on NG. What is causing this? Do I need to do a seafoam and alcohol treatment? Truck has about 52k on the clock right now.

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        • #5
          Re: filter and seafoam

          I just answered another post on this cold start issue. You have moisture in the CNG system. Oh now that I checked your name your the same fella.

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          • #6
            Re: filter and seafoam

            Okie. I had misfire on cold weather start. Now after home made seafoam (not sold in my country) 2 fills and one with isopropane alcohol my car is OK. No misfire anymore.
            And maybe the CAT is better but will know soon.
            My 02 sensor is showing pretty flat line.

            Ahh and this is CIVIC GX 99

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            • #7
              Re: filter and seafoam

              ALL,

              I am new to the forum, but wanted to thank all who have given advice.

              I went skiing last month in my 2000 F150 Bi-fuel (-18 degrees) and had a problem with the CNG, as the engine ran rough and surged from idle to midrange. When I returned home and read all about Compuvalves in the forums. So I took my truck to my local Ford CNG dealer. I ask them to change the filter and flush the system. After a day, they said there was no point in doing the work as the Compuvalave was bad with a bad "MAP" sensor which wasn't replaceable. I asked if they could do the work anyway to see if it helped and was told Ford doesn't have a flushing procedure for CNG. They quoted $4500.00 to replace the Compuvalve and filter. I declined.

              I went home and thanks to your help, I bought two filter kits on Ebay from Industrial Marketing for $35.95 each, pulled the old filter which had split maybe from water in the housing and freezing at skiing, replaced it, flushed the system and WOW! good as new.

              Thanks,
              Again!
              Lessley

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              • #8
                Re: filter and seafoam

                I am new to all this.... I am planning on purchasing a 1999 bi fuel van and figured I might as well change the filter to start and flush it so I dont have any problems down the road. Just a quick question and the mechanic side of it. I see it says you need to depressurize your tanks right? Can i just run down my tanks til they are empty? then switch out the filter? and if I am to run the seafoam through it...... my tanks will be empty to change the filter correct? or can I just shut the valve on them?

                So if I am to understand this correctly, I turn off my tanks (or depressurize them by bleeding them?!?! im confused on that) open up the filter, fill it with a little sea foam, close it back up, start the vehicle, run it for 30-40 miles, open it back up put 99 percent alcohol in a little, turn the gas on run it again............. then switch the gas off, change the filter and put all new o rings? Does that sound right? any help would be greatly appreciated..... also it wont let me start a new forum since im new to all this but any other common problems I should be weary of with a 1999 Bi fuel econoline? Planning to drive this to south america so any and all help would be greatly appreciated dont want to break down in no mans land with no one able to get me running........ thanks
                johnnie

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