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Everything you need to know about - Renewable Natural Gas To The Natural Gas Pipeline

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  • Everything you need to know about - Renewable Natural Gas To The Natural Gas Pipeline



    Since this is a peripheral issue to natural gas vehicles, but somewhat related, I decided to post it here. This is a comprehensive overview of Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) and the issues surrounding it's introduction to the Natural Gas infrastructure.

    - The Basics
    BioCycle December 2011, Vol. 52, No. 12, p. 44 Interest in supplying RNG to local gas distribution and transmission pipeline companies is increasing. Key factors about how the process works are reviewed.

    LOCAL gas distribution and transmission pipeline companies are increasingly being approached to purchase and/or take delivery of renewable natural gas (RNG) into their existing lines for general distribution. RNG is derived from anaerobic decomposition of a wide variety of organic materials, including dairy and agricultural waste and wastewater and landfill sources. Within the natural gas industry, the term “biogas” refers to gas produced directly from digesters or landfills; it is often burned on- or off-site in generators for conversion to electricity or simply flared. Cleaned biogas or biomethane, more commonly referred to today as RNG, is the target product for inclusion in the natural gas pipeline grid.



    MORE >
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  • #2
    Clean Energy is First Commercial Distributor of Transportation Fuel made from Waste

    Clean Energy is producing Redeem at biomethane production facilities in Dallas, Texas; Canton, Mich.; and is constructing a third facility in Millington, Tenn.

    http://www.cleanenergyfuels.com/news/2013/10-01-13.html

    NEWPORT BEACH, CALIFORNIA (Oct. 3, 2013) – Clean Energy Fuels Corp. (Nasdaq: CLNE), North America’s largest provider of natural gas for transportation, announced today that it will be the first company to commercially distribute a renewable natural gas vehicle fuel, called Redeem, made from waste streams such as landfills, large dairies and sewage plants directly to fleets around the country and at the 35 public Clean Energy stations throughout California. Thousands of cars, taxis, shuttles and industrial fleets in California are now using Clean Energy’s Redeem, which is up to 90% cleaner than diesel and 100% renewable.

    “It’s a landmark day for Clean Energy as the first company to make this revolutionary and renewable transportation fuel made from waste available to our customers,” said Andrew J. Littlefair, president and CEO of Clean Energy. “Our goal is to produce and distribute 15 million gallons of Redeem in our first year which can make significant progress towards achieving California’s climate change goals and prove that this is a viable, cleaner and abundant alternative fuel source for our future.”

    Clean Energy is staking a leadership position in the renewable fuels market through its significant investment in a natural gas fueling infrastructure, including 400 fueling stations throughout the nation, and in the development of multiple biomethane production facilities that will produce Redeem.

    ...California Air Resource Board estimates, Redeem sourced from landfill gas can enable up to a 90% reduction in carbon emissions when displacing diesel or gasoline in CNG...

    Today, Clean Energy is producing Redeem at biomethane production facilities in Dallas, Texas; Canton, Mich.; and is constructing a third facility in Millington, Tenn. with plans to develop other production facilities across the country. Clean Energy also sources biomethane from third parties to market and distribute as Redeem vehicle fuel. For graphics and additional information, visit:

    www.redeembycleanenergy.com
    .

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    • #3
      Clean Energy's 2012 Annual Report describes its RNG facilities

      RNG
      "We own a 70% interest in a RNG production facility at the McCommas Bluff landfill located in Dallas, Texas. We sell RNG produced at the facility to Shell Energy North America under a Gas Sale Agreement and, depending upon RNG production volumes, we have the ability to sell RNG as a vehicle fuel. We own a second RNG production facility located at a Republic Services landfill in Canton, Michigan. This facility was completed in 2012, and we have entered into a ten-year fixed-price sale contract for the majority of the RNG that we expect the facility to produce (the effectiveness of such contract is subject to the CEC certifying the facility). We are building a third RNG facility at a Republic Services landfill in North Shelby, Tennessee, and we expect the facility to be operational during the first quarter of 2014. We are seeking to expand our RNG business by pursuing additional RNG production projects. We sell some of the RNG we currently produce, and expect to sell a significant amount of the RNG we produce at the facilities we are building and plan to build, through our natural gas fueling infrastructure for use as a vehicle fuel. In addition, we plan to purchase RNG from third party producers, and sell that RNG for vehicle use through our fueling infrastructure."
      .

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      • #4
        Re: Clean Energy's 2012 Annual Report describes its RNG facilities

        what is the btu content of this redeem gas?

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        • #5
          Re: Clean Energy's 2012 Annual Report describes its RNG facilities

          must be very low as no one wants to talk about it. putting low btu gas in the natural gas pipelines is just stealing the word natural means just that. It is bad that they have cut the btu to 1050 it used to be anywhere from about 1150 to as high as 1400 at my house in the pipeline now a cubic foot will not make as much heat so it costs more to heat your house. now they want to dump very low btu gas in the line.

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          • #6
            Re: Clean Energy's 2012 Annual Report describes its RNG facilities

            When I got into this business it was 114.000 btu's per GGE. I wonder when "they" will change the definition of GGE, DGE, and cu.ft? Sounds like "they" have figured out another way to sell us "crap" And they are still flaring off natural gas.

            Larrycng

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            • #7
              Re: Everything you need to know about - Renewable Natural Gas To The Natural Gas Pipe

              Landfill gas is usually nasty stuff , with very low btu content. Not suitable for cng , unless treated and refined. Liquification to extract pure methane is the best way if intended for motor fuel use as LNG or CNG.

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              • #8
                Re: Everything you need to know about - Renewable Natural Gas To The Natural Gas Pipe

                WA BioGas study lists sites presently flaring off large amounts of natural gas (p. 11) and mentions process that Prometheus is developing to clean gas by making LNG (p.58).

                http://www.energy.wsu.edu/Documents/...leanCities.pdf
                .

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                • #9
                  Re: Everything you need to know about - Renewable Natural Gas To The Natural Gas Pipe

                  I am involved with several landfills where we use landfill gas to power generator sets. Usually the prime mover is a 3516 or 3520 Cat running with spark ignition at reduced speed (1200 rpm) and reduced output from it's Diesel counterpart. Our gas typically runs between 500-600 btu's vs. around 1000 btu's for pipeline quality gas. Along with the methane, there are a lot of undesirable constituents in the gas that the engines don't like. There is a lot of silica content in the gas which coats the valves and heads leading to a bunch of cylinder head overhauling. We actually re-manufacture our own heads as we need to recondition them so often. We hooked a fuelmaker up to the gas stream and filled one of our fumigation Cavaliers to it to see if it would run. Surprise, surprise, it actually ran---although with very low power output. To put landfill gas into the pipeline, there must be a bunch of cleanup being done to the gas otherwise there will be a whole lot of unhappy campers out there.

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                  • #10
                    BP plc will pay $155 million to acquire the upstream portion of Clean Energy Fuels Corp s renewable natural gas (RNG) business.

                    RNG is produced entirely from organic waste and can be comingled with traditional gas in existing pipeline networks.

                    - Clean Energy will buy RNG from BP and collect royalties on gas purchased from BP and sold as Redeem at its stations;
                    - BP will acquire production facilities in Canton, MI, and North Shelby, TN, as well as facilities under construction in Oklahoma City and Atlanta
                    - BP will continue to subcontract the operations to Clean Energy.

                    Redeem RNG brand was launched three years ago in California. Clean Energy sold 60 million gasoline gallon equivalents (GGE) last year to customers across multiple states.

                    https://www.cleanenergyfuels.com/pre...upply-agreeme/
                    .

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                    • #11
                      In 2013, Recology teamed up with G2 Energy to install a landfill gas-capture system at Recology Hay Road in Vacaville, CA. This system pulls the methane gas generated by the landfill and turns it into electricity to power homes and businesses nearby. The methane gas that’s pumped from the landfill is sent to an energy conversion facility operated by G2 Energy.

                      As a result, the methane captured from the landfill is now providing 1.6 megawatts of electricity – Enough to power up to 1,600 homes. This is equivalent to taking about 13,000 cars off the road, planting 14,500 acres of forest or otherwise offsetting consumption of approximately 7.6 million gallons of gasoline.

                      https://www.recology.com/environment...ogies-in-waste
                      .

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                      • #12
                        Renewable Natural Gas Production At Cedar Hills, Washington Regional Landfill

                        RNG is one of the most environmentally friendly fuels in the world, coming from renewable sources like food waste, dairy farm waste, and decaying garbage in landfills. At the link, a group from Western Washington Clean Cities shows photos of their tour of the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill located on 920 acres in Maple Valley Washington State:

                        http://wwcleancities.org/494/From-Ga...-To-Green-Fuel


                        To tour facility, contact:

                        http://kingcounty.gov/depts/dnrp/sol...sal/tours.aspx
                        .

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