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LNG heat value question?

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  • #16
    Blue Origin New Shepard space vehicle successfully flew to space before executing a historic landing back at the launch site in West Texas in 2015:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pillaOxGCo


    Blue Origin is developing rocket motor fueled with LNG:

    The BE-4 uses oxygen-rich staged combustion of liquid oxygen and LNG to produce 550,000 lbs. of thrust. LNG is commercially available, affordable, and highly efficient for spaceflight. Unlike other rocket fuels, such as kerosene, LNG can be used to pressurize a rocket s propellant tanks. This is called autogenous pressurization and eliminates the need for costly and complex pressurization systems, like helium. LNG also leaves no soot byproducts as kerosene does, simplifying engine reuse:

    https://www.lngindustry.com/small-sc...t-in-mid-2020/


    https://www.blueorigin.com/engines#be-4


    And, a theme song for the quantum advance for natural gas fuel reported above:

    Im Your Vehicle, Baby - The Ides Of March

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiLaNEFyCiM
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    • #17
      SpaceX test-fired a high thrust methane rocket motor 4 Feb 2019 called the Raptor at the company test site in McGregor TX. A total of seven of the motors will power their Starship upper stage to the Moon and, later, to Mars with 31 motors used in the Super Heavy booster that carries the Starship into space.

      The company claims that methane gives better performance than the present kerosene motors (used on Russian Soyuz.) SpaceX is already developing high efficiency CO2 capture with H2O to form liquid CH4 (methane) & O2, critical for propellant production on Mars:

      https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/4/18...ull-size-texas
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      • #18
        Speaking of rockets. archived Houston Command logs from Apollo 11 - rebroadcast on the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing - show 5,000 lbs/min of propellant (2 min burn) were used to leave moon orbit and head back to Earth. Comments from the crew say the burns - landing; launch; leaving orbit to head to Moon and to head back - were silent . . in contrast to the same shots in the movie Apollo 13.

        https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/
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