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  • Retail Hydrogen Stations

    City of Lawndale CA- which is only two square miles in area - welcomed the nation s 28th retail hydrogen station for fuel cell electric (FEV) vehicles June 27, 2017.

    https://cafcp.org/blog/lawndale-station-open


    More than $17 million was approved for nine new hydrogen stations that will expand the refueling infrastructure network in California. FirstElement Fuel Inc. will develop eight hydrogen refueling stations. Five of those will be located in Southern California in Huntington Beach, Irvine, San Diego, Santa Monica and Sherman Oaks. The remaining three will be in the Bay Area in Campbell, Oakland and Sunnyvale. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies U.S. LLC received funds for a refueling station in Santa Nella that will connect the Southern California and the Bay Area stations.

    https://ngtnews.com/energy-commissio...ueling-network
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  • #2
    Joseph Bebon for NGTNews November 30, 2017 - Toyota Motor North America Inc. has announced plans to build what it claims will be world s first megawatt-scale carbonate fuel cell power generation plant with a hydrogen fueling station to support its operations at the Port of Long Beach, Calif. Announced at the Los Angeles Auto Show, the Tri-Gen facility will use bio-waste sourced from California agricultural waste to generate water, electricity and hydrogen. It will come online in 2020.

    When it comes online in 2020, Tri-Gen will generate approximately 2.35 MW of electricity and 1.2 tons of hydrogen per day, enough to power the equivalent of about 2,350 average-sized homes and meet the daily driving needs of nearly 1,500 vehicles, according to Toyota.

    Tri-Gen has been developed by FuelCell Energy with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, California Air Resources Board, South Coast Air Quality Management District, Orange County Sanitation District, and University of California at Irvine, whose research helped develop the core technology.

    Doug Murtha, group vice president of strategic planning, says Tri-Gen is a major step forward for sustainable mobility and a key accomplishment of our 2050 Environmental Challenge to achieve net zero CO2 emissions from our operations. 31 retail hydrogen stations are now open for business in California, and Toyota continues to partner with a broad range of companies to develop new stations.

    https://ngtnews.com/toyota-build-mul...alifornia-port


    https://www.fuelcellenergy.com

    H2_FuelCellEnergy.png
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    • #3
      NGVJournal 27 Feb 2018 - In Germany, 24 public H2 refueling stations have gone into operation in 2017, turning the German public hydrogen refueling infrastructure into the second largest globally with 45 public stations, ahead of the United States (40 stations) and only surpassed by Japan with 91 public H2 stations. Moreover, a total of 64 stations were opened worldwide in the past year. When looking at the number of hydrogen refueling stations per inhabitant, Germany ranks fourth behind Denmark, Norway, and Japan, closely followed by Austria. These results are reported in the 10th annual assessment by H2stations.org who also reports that 139 hydrogen stations are currently in operation in Europe, 118 in Asia, 68 in North America, one each in South America, Australia, and Dubai.

      On a European level, national networks are complemented by seamless hydrogen corridors from Norway to northern Italy and from western Switzerland to Vienna, which had already formed last year. These have been consolidated by further 36 publicly accessible hydrogen stations.

      http://www.ngvjournal.com/s1-news/c4...ENVIO%20SIMPLE
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      • #4
        Why? We couldn't even make a go of it with CNG passenger cars let alone something as stupid as Hydrogen Fuel Cell vehicles. BEV's will knock these off quickly as Fuel Cell vehicles are just a BEV with a Fuel Cell "range extender". No point in them.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by siai47 View Post
          Why? We couldn't even make a go of it with CNG passenger cars let alone something as stupid as Hydrogen Fuel Cell vehicles. BEV's will knock these off quickly as Fuel Cell vehicles are just a BEV with a Fuel Cell "range extender". No point in them.
          The H2 at the stations I am familiar with is derived from NG as feed stock using the Steam Reform method , so IMO, the vehicles are actually powered by NG..

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          • #6
            Cory Shumaker for Act-News June 21, 2018 - Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are seen as a way to reach zero emissions when batteries are not feasible, such as delivery fleets, heavy-duty vehicles, locomotives and maritime vessels. Countries like France, Norway, and Germany have made big strides to develop and deploy hydrogen fuel cells in a variety of applications.

            Currently, France has only 260 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in the country; however, the government s plan is to have 5,200 hydrogen powered vehicles (primarily commercial and heavy duty vehicles) by 2023. For infrastructure, the goal is to have 100 hydrogen refueling stations by 2023 compared to the 20 that exist today.

            Norway is seeing a great opportunity to play a major role in the global market for hydrogen. With their large government subsidies for battery-electric vehicles, you can now see one electric vehicle out of every five cars on the roads. The first fuel cell ferry is scheduled to be in operation by 2021.

            Germany has 43 hydrogen fueling stations, and there is an ambitious national program to build 100 hydrogen stations by 2019 and 400 stations by 2023. The biggest news of out of Germany is the use of fuel cell locomotives developed by Hydrogenics and French train manufacturer Alstom. Hydrogenics stated it will assist in building 40 fuel cell trains by 2020 for the Germany and the UK. To date Alstom has completed the first operational tests of its Coradia iLint fuel cell train:

            https://www.act-news.com/news/hydrog...coming-of-age/
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            • #7
              I still wonder what happened to natural gas as a vehicle fuel. Is natural gas no longer useful because it doesn't have the absolute lowest possible emissions? Have the prices of fuel cell stacks dropped by several orders of magnitude to make them competitive with other sources of power? Has the useful life of a fuel cell increased by the same order of magnitude? How does the fuel cell train carry it's fuel? There must be tank cars full of it behind the locomotive and the hold of the ferry boat must be full of the same tanks. How much energy is used in the conversion of natural gas feed stocks to Hydrogen? I must be getting old as I still don't get the push to hydrogen when it appears that there are better alternatives out there that aren't being used to their fullest extent. Something is wrong when there is an "ambitious national program" to build hydrogen stations. That tells the story that it still doesn't make economic sense to use fuel cells. Even CNG quickly moved away from complete government support and into the private sector in regard to fueling stations---BEV refueling is moving down the same path. Good luck with this, I won't live long enough to see cost competitive fuel cell vehicles on the road.

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              • #8
                The best efficiency claimed of methane to H2 conversion using steam reform is currently about 58% currently. Then add ? for the compression to 10,000 psi. LNG for heavy duty applications, LPG and Battery Electric for passenger cars . H2 ? Nice experiments. On another note, U of Wisconsin ? has test-bed ICE's running truly duel fuel with gasoline or cng as the low reactive fuel, and diesel as the high reactive fuel, claiming 60% efficiency . That is close to double of a diesel.

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                • #9
                  Brian Straight for FreightWaves March 7, 2017 - The Nikola One tractor from Salt Lake City-based Nikola Motors represents a potential operational advantage for those that buy in to the idea of a hydrogen-powered electric truck says Trevor Milton, founder & CEO.

                  Nikola Motor is promising to provide 1 million miles of hydrogen fuel, plus maintenance, tires and some ancillary items such as truck washes as part of a monthly lease program that will range from $5,000 to $7,000. Having Ryder System, which will provide maintenance, sales and distribution of Nikola One (sleeper) and Nikola Two (day cab) upon launch in 2021, is a big boost for Nikola Motor.

                  Nikola plans to open 35 hydrogen stations per year with an eventual national network of 364 stations. The tractor will have an effective range of 800 to 1,200 mi. The electric engine is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell and produces 2,000 ft-lbs of torque and 1,000 hp. with a 320 kWh battery. The initial trucks will be assembled by Fitzgerald Glider Kits, which will produce 5,000 trucks a year. Eventually, Nikola plans to build its own manufacturing facility:

                  https://www.freightwaves.com/news/wh...ectric-tractor


                  http://www.fleetowner.com/running-gr...electric-truck
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                  • #10
                    Rolf Lockwood for TruckingInfo Sept 5 2018 - Commentary: Is Hydrogen Fuel the Future?

                    Toyota, Hyundai, and Honda all have commercially available fuel-cell models, and fuel-cell growth in the transportation sector nearly tripled last year. There were nearly 3,500 fuel-cell electric cars on the road in the U.S., primarily in California, through the end of 2017.

                    As of the end of 2017, there were 40 retail hydrogen stations and nine non-retail stations in the U.S., but 45 (plus 11 private fleet facilities) in Germany alone. As many as 400 service stations are planned there by 2023 as part of the H2 Mobility Joint Venture run by Daimler, Linde, Shell, Total, and others. Europe has a clear lead over North America, not least because the German government very actively supports infrastructure development. But Japan is more advanced still, with 91 public outlets.

                    By 2028, Nikola plans to have more than 700 Nel-built hydrogen stations across the U.S. and Canada. The first 14 stations will be up and running by 2021, we’re promised. With a range of between 500 and 1,200 miles and refill time within 20 minutes, Nikola trucks will be in fleets beginning in 2020 and in full production by 2021, the company says.


                    https://www.truckinginfo.com/312525/...uel-the-future
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                    • #11
                      I think hydrogen for sale to the public is a very bad idea as a small amount will make a big noise terrorists could do some very bad things with it. plus I still think of it as a energy carrier rather than a fuel

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                      • #12
                        Brian Straight for FreightWaves Nov 05, 2018 - Nikola Motor to introduce hydrogen-electric tractor to Europe

                        The European model will feature between 500 and 1,000 hp. and a range of 500 to 1,200 kilometers, depending on configuration. The electric engine in the Nikola tractors is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell and produces 2,000 lbs.-ft. of torque and 1,000 hp. with a 320 kWh battery. With a 2,000 lbs. estimated weight saving (18,000 vs. 19,000 lbs. for a diesel unit), Nikola says that vehicles could potentially haul additional weight leading to up to $1,000 extra revenue per load.

                        The North American models, the Nikola One and Nikola Two (day cab), will be produced in an Arizona manufacturing plant. The company is spending more than $1 billion over the next six years to develop the facility on the west side of Phoenix. The company says it has orders for more than 8,000 trucks. All three models will be on display at Nikola World in Phoenix, April 16-17, 2019.

                        Nel, of Oslo, Norway, is working to develop dozens of hydrogen stations in the U.S. to help support orders here, including an order for more than 800 trucks placed this year by Anheuser-Busch.

                        By 2028, Nikola is planning on having more than 700 hydrogen stations across the USA and Canada. Each station is capable of 2,000 to 8,000 kgs of daily hydrogen production, the company said.

                        https://www.freightwaves.com/news/fu...ruck-in-europe
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 300mileclub View Post
                          Brian Straight for FreightWaves Nov 05, 2018 - Nikola Motor to introduce hydrogen-electric tractor to Europe

                          The European model will feature between 500 and 1,000 hp. and a range of 500 to 1,200 kilometers, depending on configuration. The electric engine in the Nikola tractors is powered by a hydrogen fuel cell and produces 2,000 lbs.-ft. of torque and 1,000 hp. with a 320 kWh battery. With a 2,000 lbs. estimated weight saving (18,000 vs. 19,000 lbs. for a diesel unit), Nikola says that vehicles could potentially haul additional weight leading to up to $1,000 extra revenue per load.

                          The North American models, the Nikola One and Nikola Two (day cab), will be produced in an Arizona manufacturing plant. The company is spending more than $1 billion over the next six years to develop the facility on the west side of Phoenix. The company says it has orders for more than 8,000 trucks. All three models will be on display at Nikola World in Phoenix, April 16-17, 2019.

                          Nel, of Oslo, Norway, is working to develop dozens of hydrogen stations in the U.S. to help support orders here, including an order for more than 800 trucks placed this year by Anheuser-Busch.

                          By 2028, Nikola is planning on having more than 700 hydrogen stations across the USA and Canada. Each station is capable of 2,000 to 8,000 kgs of daily hydrogen production, the company said.

                          https://www.freightwaves.com/news/fu...ruck-in-europe
                          ok 2000lbs weight saving last time I was in school 18000 vs 19000 lbs for a diesel unit is 1000 lbs and I have been in and out of trucking all my life a well I want some of that freight 1 doller a mile per lb . for 1000 lbs of weight savings or .50 per lb if it is 2000 lbs weight savings I Call BS

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                          • #14
                            Hey cowboy, its good to hear from you again.
                            I'm skeptical of the hydrogen for heavy-haul hype too.

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                            • #15
                              Tom Wilkerson for resource management publication, Waster - 12 June 2018: You heard of Hydrogen Cars, but now it is Lifts?

                              It seems hydrogen forklifts are here to stay – for good. Hydrogen lifts are already used in closed environments like warehouses, which is proof positive of their zero emission capability. Hydrogen fuel is more efficient than fossil fuels like gasoline. Up to 60 percent of the available energy in hydrogen fuels cells are utilized, compared to the 20% rate of gasoline. A fuel cell produces electricity through a chemical reaction, converting hydrogen and oxygen into water, and in doing so, creates electricity.

                              Hydrogen forklifts are offered by Hydrogenics; Toshiba; Toyota(Hyster); and Plug Power, Inc. to name a few.

                              Japanese automaker Toyota, in the Aichi Prefecture, has deployed 20 new forklifts at the Motomachi Plant each equipped with hydrogen fuel cells. Toyota has also built a new hydrogen station at the Motomachi Plant, which will provide the forklifts with the fuel they need to operate. The new units utilise Hyster s durable high performance Nuvera fuel cell systems, to replace current lead acid batteries in class I, II and III electric lift trucks.

                              The Australian hydrogen sector celebrated an important milestone today with the launch of the first hydrogen fuel cell forklift in the country by HMA member Hyster-Yale.

                              Amazon is entering the fuel-cell business to outmaneuver Walmart by building cheaper warehouses and it is fueling up on hydrogen. The online retailer agreed to buy $70 million of fuel-cell forklifts from manufacturer Plug Power this year (2018).

                              And in July, Wal-Mart Stores matched Amazon’s $600 million deal with a similar one, committing to double, to 58, the number of its warehouses that use forklifts running on Power Plug cells.

                              Hyundai now has a hydrogen-fuelled vehicle available in Canada, and Toyota wants to introduce theirs here too, while Canadian fuel cell developers that include Ballard Power Systems and Hydrogenics have been busy putting their product in everything from trains to buses and forklifts.



                              https://wastersblog.com/97442/hydrogen-forklifts/
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