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Where are we with the new administration?

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  • Where are we with the new administration?

    Ok, We will have Trump for the next 4 years. Where do fellow CNG Chat followers see the industry going? How about the 50 cent per GGE tax rebate/ subsidy?

  • #2
    Well, it seems Trump is pro-energy and will likely make the XL Keystone pipelines happen, etc. So its likely that incoming DOE secretary Rick Perry of Texas will be all about expanding use of domestic fuel. But what I'm hearing from NGV America is that the 50 cent tax credit would have to be re-born inside a comprehensive tax reform bill, as opposed to the "tax extenders" method which was used in years before to keep it and other tax perks alive.

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    • #3
      in my opinion either eliminate the 7500 tax credit for rich guys that buy 185,000 $ teslas or offer it both for cng vehicles and electrics....better yet have a cap of 40 or 50 thousand dollars for the max price of a passenger vehicle (F150 sized vehicles or smaller).


      This offers the biggest benefit to the people who need it, lets be honest if you can afford a 185,000 silicon valley status symbol do you really need a 7500$ tax credit?

      this isnt against tesla, i really see no problem with a 30-40k model 3 being offered with a tax credit.

      If there was a 7500$ credit would honda of cancelled the CNG civic program?
      or the impala bi-fuel for that matter.

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      • #4
        I have bought cars with or without the Federal tax credit. Yeah, I guess I am one of the "rich guys" that bought a new Tesla and took advantage of the tax credit---for about half of the 185,000 $ trdscfjc mentioned. I also bought a $35,000 Chevy Volt and also took advantage of the credit. During the time the credit was available I also bought several CNG vehicles the last being a 2015 Impala. The credit really had no influence on what vehicle I purchased. I looked at it as a reduction in the purchase price of the vehicle, nothing else. It is an incentive to promote something to government wants to have happen, i.e. the adoption of electric vehicles. The credit is reduced and ended after each manufacturer produces X amount of vehicles. The credit is a blessing and a curse. If you buy a new car and then decide to trade or sell it, you can write the value down by $7,500 as nobody is going to buy a used car for what they can get a new one for--so you need to keep the vehicle for the long haul. Also, as the better selling electrics become more mainstream, the manufacturer will reach his limit on sales and then his vehicle's cost will be $7,500 more than his competitor. My feeling is that all alternative fuel vehicles (and I am not talking about the E-85 B.S.) should be able to take advantage of this credit. If not, than there should be no credit (Federal, local or State) for any vehicle. Electric vehicles are now mainstream enough that people will buy them if they fit their needs with or without the credit. CNG vehicles have always faced an uphill battle because of limited refueling sites, fuel cost ratio v.s. gasoline or diesel, reduction in cargo capacity and a limited selection of vehicles. As far as the cancellation of the CNG Civic or the Impala they currently don't make economic sense even if the credit had been applied with today's low gasoline pricing. So although I would like to see natural gas being used more as a transportation fuel, I don't think the future bodes well for passenger car and light truck adoption. The only way it could happen is if the government decrees that a certain amount of the vehicle mix is powered by a specific fuel. That was tried by the State of California over a decade ago with electrics and you can see what happened with that so don't expect the Federal government to do anything to help CNG.

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        • Chip Marce
          Chip Marce commented
          Editing a comment
          I don't think the issue is so much a tax credit as the lack of refueling stations. In that, I think that the Natural Gas industry is largely retarding it's own progress. Offer refueling options that are accessible, that allow for long distance travel, and fuel that is half the cost of gasoline and you'll have an audience.

      • #5
        If the 50 cent a gallon "rebate" is removed I can serious problems ahead for CNG station competitiveness. If EPA standards are relaxed the only CNG growth we will see will be in Oklahoma and California.

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        • #6
          Minded to the fact that your petrol prices means you're virtually given the stuff ( even allowing for a imperial gallon being about a fifth bigger than a US gallon, we still pay approx three times US prices, about USD10 a US gallon) I did wonder what the incentive was your side of the pond. Do I have this correct, you get USD0.50 per GGE in rebate? How do you cliam this or is this all done at point of sale?

          So without tax breaks is CNG still viable?

          BTW CNGPizza, thank you for the Recepetacle you're sorting out for me.
          Last edited by BritCNGUser; 3 days ago.

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          • #7
            CNG for passenger car use seems nearly dead in 2017. With/without Trump admin.
            Last edited by GX-SV; 3 days ago.
            2010 GX (w/Webasto moonroof, Curt hitch, 3M CS 50% tint, Alpine inew957hd nav rec)

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