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Great lake ship SS-Badger on natural gas

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  • #16
    City records show about 39 million gallons a year, about 45 percent of the plant’s production capacity, would fuel two Totem Ocean Trailer Express ships that run the regular Tacoma-Anchorage route and are being converted to LNG to cut pollution. The ships now run on marine bunker fuel, a diesel-based mix regarded as a heavy pollutant.

    Utility customers would use another 6 million gallons a year, drawn on six peak-demand days, said Jim Hogan, PSEs project manager for the plant. That LNG would be warmed in a hot-water vaporizer on the plant site, scented with commercial methane’s telltale odor for safety and piped out as gas for home and commercial use.

    The rest of the LNG, about 45 percent of the plant’s output, is projected to be sold to trucks and ships that convert from diesel and marine bunker fuel to run on LNG, Hogan said. All ships other than TOTE’s vessels would tank up with LNG from a fuel barge loaded at the dockside, Hogan said, similar to the process currently used to load marine bunker fuel.

    The LNG plant with its 8M gal tank is not big enough to fill an LNG tanker to export fuel.

    http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/l...e87326512.html
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    • #17
      Jan 12 2017 Salish Orca, the first of three new LNG-fueled Salish Class vessels built for BC Ferries, arrived in British Columbia yesterday after a 50-day 10,440 nautical mile journey from Remontowa Shipbuilding s Gdansk, Poland, shipyard.

      Salish Orca is scheduled to start service on the B.C. Comox-Powell River route in the spring of 2017. Salish Eagle and Salish Raven are scheduled to arrive in early 2017 and are projected to be introduced into service on the B.C. Southern Gulf Islands routes by summer 2017, according to the company. The Salish Class Ferries (SCF), including Salish Orca, Salish Eagle and Salish Raven, are expected to replace the company s two older vessels, the Queen of Nanaimo and the Queen of Burnaby.

      http://www.marinelog.com/index.php?o...-bc&Itemid=226


      http://www.lngworldnews.com/tag/salish-eagle/

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      • #18
        LNG ship refueling barge/ship under development by England-based Babcock International Group to be built in South Korea. Completing is set for April 2018:

        https://www.lngindustry.com/small-sc...o-develop-gsv/
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        • #19
          Two LNG -fueled ships in Florida complete two ship-years of service. To date, they have used 15M gallons of LNG trucked to the Jacksonville port in ISO containers. A shore-side plant and fueling barge is planned to produce LNG at the port. Fuel presently comes from Macon GA.

          The article goes on to outline change of plans for the two LNG ferries which were to have been put into service between Washington State and Alaska.

          http://www.fleetsandfuels.com/fuels/...t-not-so-much/
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          • #20
            On closer inspection, this viral video features the natural gas-fueled ship M.V.Greenland launch Oct 31 2015 in The Netherlands:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYXm6EWAWvY
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            • #21
              More LNG ferries begin arriving in British Columbia. Seaspan Ferries Corp. (SFC) has announced that the Seaspan Reliant – the second of two new dual-fuelled/hybrid (diesel, LNG and battery) ferries – has been successfully delivered. It is a drive on, drive off vehicle ferry with the capacity for 59 trailers. Seaspan Ferries Corporation currently operates a fleet of seven ferries out of five terminals in British Columbia, and supplies more than 50% of all cargo to Vancouver Island.

              Another first occurred this week at SFC, with assistance from VARD, FortisBC and Redwise, when the Seaspan Swift was successfully bunkered using a tanker truck to deliver LNG onboard the vessel. This type of bunkering operation was the first of its kind in North America.

              https://www.lngindustry.com/small-sc...dhybrid-ferry/


              https://www.seaspan.com/seaspan-ferr...fuelled-vessel
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              • #22
                Video of LNG ship fueling facility being constructed on 2 acres in Jacksonville. Container ships to the Trinidad/Tobago islands now use LNG and utilities on the islands are now able to use natural gas:

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fd79A3sZYCw
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                • #23
                  Mar 21, 2017 Crowley Maritime Corp. and VT Halter Marine successfully launch El Coqui, an LNG-powered combination container/Roll on-Roll off ship for the Puerto Rico trade.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4qkIqqn198
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                  • #24
                    Liquefied natural gas from the Swinoujscie LNG terminal, a subsidiary of Gaz-System, is now being loaded onto tank trucks and transported to Estonia. Its serves as fuel for ferries built in 2015 in the Polish shipyard in Gdansk. Depending on the number of orders, up to a dozen or so, tank trailers leave for various locations within 12 hours. The tank trucks leaving the terminal must travel 1,600 kilometers to get to Estonia. The ferries are fueled prior to shipping out for delivery to operators in other countries.

                    http://www.ngvjournal.com/lng-from-p...ENVIO%20SIMPLE
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                    • #25
                      In this latest agreement, Qatar Petroleum and Shell will evaluate and progress the development of LNG bunkering facilities at various locations across Europe, the Middle East and East Asia.

                      ?Increasing numbers of ship owners and operators are turning to LNG over traditional marine fuels in response to tighter sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions regulations. In October 2016, the International Maritime Organization announced the introduction of a global 0.5% sulfur cap from 2020.

                      https://ngtnews.com/shell-qatar-petr...News+Headlines
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                      • #26
                        NGC CNG Company Ltd and Scotiabank have signed an agreement to provide fuel cards to vehicle owners in Trinidad and Tobago who switch to CNG . . . Mohammed said the fuel card is key to increasing demand for CNG:

                        http://www.trinidadexpress.com/20170...-switch-to-cng
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                        • #27
                          July 3, 2017 from Wikipedia (see source for references):

                          In 1886 Karol Olszewski liquefied methane (131 years ago)

                          The East Ohio Gas Company built a full-scale commercial liquid natural gas (LNG) plant in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1940 just after a successful pilot plant built by its sister company, Hope Natural Gas Company of West Virginia. (77 years ago)

                          The Cleveland plant failed on October 20, 1944 when the cylindrical tank ruptured spilling thousands of gallons of LNG over the plant and nearby neighborhood. The gas evaporated and caught fire, which caused 130 fatalities.[6] The fire delayed further implementation of LNG facilities for several years. However, over the next 15 years new research on low-temperature alloys, and better insulation materials, set the stage for a revival of the industry. It restarted in 1959 when a U.S. World War II Liberty ship, the Methane Pioneer, converted to carry LNG, made a delivery of LNG from the U.S. Gulf coast to energy starved Great Britain. In June 1964, the world's first purpose-built LNG carrier, the "Methane Princess" entered service. The first U.S. LNG export was completed in early 2016.

                          The gas is cooled regeneratively by continually passing it through an orifice until it is cooled to temperatures at which it liquefies. The cooling of gas by expanding it through an orifice was developed by James Joule and William Thomson and is known as the Joule-Thomson effect.

                          China has been a leader in the use of LNG vehicles with over 100,000 LNG powered vehicles on the road as of Sept 2014.

                          In the United States the beginnings of a public LNG Fueling capability is being put in place. An alternative fueling centre tracking site shows 84 public truck LNG fuel centres as of Dec 2016. It is possible for large trucks to make cross country trips such as Los Angeles to Boston and refuel at public refuelling stations every 500 miles. The 2013 National Trucker's Directory lists approximately 7,000 truckstops, thus approximately 1% of US truckstops have LNG available.

                          As of December 2014 LNG fuel and NGV's have not been taken to very quickly within Europe and it is questionable whether LNG will ever become the fuel of choice among fleet operators. During the year 2015, Netherlands introduced LNG powered trucks in transport sector. Australian government is planning to develop an LNG highway to utilise the locally produced LNG and replace the imported diesel fuel used by interstate haulage vehicles.

                          In the year 2015, India also made small beginning by transporting LNG by LNG powered road tankers in Kerala state. Japan, the world’s largest importer of LNG, is set to use of LNG as road transport fuel.

                          Westport recommends CNG for engines 7 liters or smaller, and LNG with direct injection for engines between 20 and 150 liters. For engines between 7 and 20 liters either option (CNG or LNG) is recommended.

                          There are several liquefaction processes available for large, baseload LNG plants (APCI is used in most plants worldwide):

                          Liquefin - designed by Air Liquide
                          AP-C3MR - designed by Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. (APCI)
                          Cascade - designed by ConocoPhillips
                          AP-X® - designed by Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. (APCI)
                          DMR (Dual Mixed Refrigerant)
                          SMR (Single Mixed Refrigerant)
                          MFC® (mixed fluid cascade) - designed by Linde
                          PRICO® (SMR) - designed by Black & Veatch

                          World total production (Mmtpa): 1990 (50); 2002 (130); 2007 (160); 2014 (246). As of January 2016, global nominal LNG liquefaction capacity was 301.5 MTPA (million tonnes per annum), and liquefaction capacity under construction was 142 MTPA.
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                          • #28
                            BC Ferries has announced that the Salish Eagle – the second of the company’s three LNG dual-fuel Salish Class vessels – will officially commence service on 21 June 2017.

                            https://www.lngindustry.com/small-sc...mence-service/
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                            • #29
                              June 14 2017 by Lauren Tyler of NGTNews - When strict MARPOL/ECA emissions regulations take effect in 2020, several of the older steam-powered vessels serving the Hawaii-West Coast trade route today will be out of compliance without substantial, costly modifications.

                              With expected deliveries in 2020 and 2021, two 3,600 TEU Aloha class LNG-fueled containerships will be built at the Philly Shipyard, formerly Aker Philadelphia Shipyard, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on part of the site of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard:

                              https://ngtnews.com/philly-shipyard-...inership-fleet
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                              • #30
                                Rolls-Royce has signed a deal to supply engines to power five LNG ferries operating between Bergen and Stord in Norway. The nine cylinder in-line engines operate at 1000 rpm and produce 3250HP. They are IMO Tier 3-compliant without the need for exhaust aftertreatment. Four earlier ferries in the 33 ship fleet have been in operation on two routes serving Lofoten:

                                https://ngtnews.com/rolls-royce-supp...wegian-ferries
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