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Crossing the Southwest on Interstate 40 with public CNG fueling

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  • 300mileclub
    replied
    Re: Crossing the Southwest on Interstate 40 with public CNG fueling

    Trucks drove 75 mph along with the cars along Interstate 40. Once I left California, I didn't see any signs limiting trucks to 55 mph (and the roads weren't falling apart.) I could fuel about every 100 miles in OK and TX and drove 75 mph with the A/C on. I'm not sure if anywhere else in the country has roads as good as Texas:

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/201...a-c7-corvette/

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  • Andrew
    replied
    Re: Crossing the Southwest on Interstate 40 with public CNG fueling

    Based on this I'd say that those with newer versions of the Civic (2012) will be fine at 65-70mph with AC on. None of these fills approached 6 GGE's except for the one you noted you were lost. In my 2012 I once had a 7 GGE fill.

    On the other hand it is a bit uncomfortable to need to make on the fly calculations based on changing road conditions or unexpected weak fills/down stations. Obviously the route could use another station between albuquerque and amarillo, but it's still feasible to do it at regular speed and more than safe at slower speeds.

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  • 300mileclub
    replied
    Now, we have a gateway to the West for our CNG fleet." Photo taken in Thackerville OK at the Chickasaw CNG station.

    http://www.ngtnews.com/e107_plugins/...News+Headlines


    Basic Energy Services Peterbilt LNG Photo taken at CLEAN ENERGY CLNG station at 1075 Everman Pkwy, Fort Worth TX.

    http://basicenergyservices.com


    Western Dairy Transport (WDT), is headquartered in Cabool Missouri. This Class-8 Kenworth CNG sleeper truck uses the 12.1 liter Cummins Westport engine. This engine will handle 80,000 pounds under the right applications. Photo taken at AMPCNG station in Waco TX, which is part of a network of stations the AMP-Trillium join venture has completed or is constructing in Waco, Amarillo, Harrold, Sweetwater, Weatherford, Kerrville and Midlandhydraulic intensifier for faster CNG fueling. The station features three dispensers and allows for three Class 8 trucks to fuel simultaneously. Photo taken at AMPCNG station in Waco TX.

    http://www.wdtmilk.com

    http://ampcng.com/2013/10/08/national-dairy/

    http://bulktransporter.com/trends/na...uck-fleet-fuel

    http://www.fleetsandfuels.com/fuels/...t-cng-in-waco/http://hankstruckforum.com/htforum/i...?topic=71399.0


    Reynolds Nationwide 6,500-gallon Polar tank trailer and Peterbilt tractor (blue with sleeper) hauling milk arrive at Bryan TX CNG4America fuel station located at a Flying J. Reynolds was buying 40,000 gallons of diesel daily in 2008 according to the article. Company hauls milk, chocolate, tequila, and a variety of other liquid foodgrade products. Photo taken at Biggas Truck Stop 2890 N Harvey Mitchell Pkwy Bryan, TX CNG4America fuel island.

    http://bulktransporter.com/tank-flee...dgrade-service


    Central Freight Lines was able to take advantage of a Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) program that gives participants the opportunity to trade a less-efficient truck towards a cost reduction on each new CNG-fueled truck purchased - in this case, a Freightliner M2 112. Central Freight Lines is partnering to build new CNG stations in Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio as a result of the decision to convert the fleet to CNG technology. Central Freight Lines, headquartered in Waco Texas, has a network consisting of 51 terminals throughout the Southwest and is a less-than-truckload (LTL) general commodities carrier. Photo taken at AMPCNG station in Waco TX.

    http://cleanlogisticsconsulting.com/...ucks-to-fleet/

    CNG_Coremark_WacoTX.JPG
    Shown is a newer version of the CNG Freightliner. Photo taken at AMPCNG station in Waco TX.

    http://www.core-mark.com

    http://www.gladstein.org/gna-casestudies/core-mark/
    Attached Files

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  • 300mileclub
    replied
    driving 50 on an interstate posted for 75. My technique is to study each vehicle approaching from behind to check that they are not distracted and that they begin to pull around me. Two or three times in the 5000 miles of this trip, I drove on the shoulder until the vehicle overtook me. At night (cooler, less wind), I would use my flashers to alert the big rigs that they would need to pass. I agree that this is hazardous.

    What I found was that I arrived at the fuel station - after each of the 250+ mile legs - with 4 bars of fuel or more remaining. I can conclude from this that 55 or 60 can be tried on future runs. Wind drag climbs exponentially with speed, and I have kept from running out of fuel on a number of trips over the years by slowing to 40 (usually on country roads) where there is essentially no wind drag at all.

    I'd also like to acknowledge that my twin brother loaned me a 2008 GX for the trip. I figured the fuel use data would be more useful to others than taking my 2004 with the CVT transmission (and the low rolling resistance, worn tires.)

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  • Skipper
    replied
    Re: Crossing the Southwest on Interstate 40 with public CNG fueling

    Agree with cowboy. Most customers would never consider CNG if they read your post. Seems like a nightmare and big inconvenience. Something must be wrong with you engine if you cant run over 50mph with the AC on. Further, this is another reason why bi-fuel conversions are so great... you dont have to sweat when low on CNG.

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  • cowboy
    replied
    Re: Crossing the Southwest on Interstate 40 with public CNG fueling

    my thoughts are add a 1gge tank and run the ac it gets real hot in the sw. If I pay for ac I intend to use it. why would I buy a car that has too small a tank to run the ac. and running 50 mph YOU ARE A HAZARD TO YOURSELF AND EVERYONE ELSE ON THE ROAD.You could end up stuck in the air intake of a big truck.LOL

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