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  • Compressing Bio-gas

    I have been building compressors for the scuba, paintball and air gun community for over 40 years. I am a moderator on Compressor_Team and a regular contributor on ScubaBoard. Two years ago I received a call from a farmer in Nebraska who owns a commercial hog farm . He explained that he has a biodigester creating excess methane and has been running his farm for several years on a 100 HP diesel generator powered by methane from the digester.
    He told me he "flared off" the equivalent of 180,000 gallons of diesel fuel last year and wanted a method to compress it for use on his tractors and farm trucks. He also had a neighbor who runs the local COOP and they wanted to supply methane to local farmers to run their tractors and trucks with CNG. He now has several of my compressors and is supplying CNG to several other farmers around Dodge, Nebraska. Needless to say there were many obstacles to overcome because the biodigester also creates Hydrogen Sulfide and has very high humidity. Both of these issues had to be overcome because the compressor can't operate with sulphuric acid (by product of H2S) and high humidity. The compressors work extremely well with dry commercial natural gas. I want to learn more about CNG applications and the hardware use in the industry
    Frogman72
    Jim Shelden
    <sheldensportinggoods.com>

  • #2
    Re: New to CNG group but not to compressors

    Caterpillar makes generators for landfill gas, they might be a good place to start. The biomass industry has a lot of information, this is not something you need to solve yourself. Have you pursued this further? I would be glad to find you some links. Biogas is the most desired vehicle fuel because of the environmental cachet.

    http://blog.ampamericas.com/category/news/

    http://blog.ampamericas.com/

    http://www.nwitimes.com/business/loc...a5c7541a2.html

    Please let me know if I can help you find anything on the web.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New to CNG group but not to compressors

      I have ran generators on municipal waste gas before. You have to make sure the engines are set up for sour gas use, and compressor the same. there are some low tech ways to clean the gas. One is bubling it through lime hydrated water, use a water trap, then drying with desicant type filter. sour gas egines high dollars due to most use stainless steel pistons ect. Check out waste age magazine for landfill apps just the same product maybe better CH4 content from hog confinement.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New to CNG group but not to compressors

        High H2S content gas is very expensive to clean up, this should never be used for CNG. The main concern would be for damage to storage leading to catastrophic failure.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New to CNG group but not to compressors

          ccgas and cng mike, Thanks for all the information. I really don't know much about this. I am just a researcher and blogger. I have been a biomass fan since I had a corn stove, when corn was $1.80 a bushel. That was before ethanol. I now live in a modern, well insulated, home. I want to learn all I can though, so I can advocate biogas as a green source for CNG to the extreme environmentalists. Is all manure equal or is some worse. Human chicken, horse, cow, hog? I know chicken is hot, but I don't know how much hydrogen sulfide etc.

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          • #6
            Re: New to CNG group but not to compressors

            From my reading, the H2S is attracted to iron. Metal shavings or steel wool are used to filter for it. Lime water to absorb CO2 and silica gel seems about the best for removing siloxane (and final moisture reduction).

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Compressing Bio-gas

              As for manures... some are better than others. Don't know much about the quality of the crap though. More importantly is the mix of manure with other stuff. (hay, straw, etc) In large digesters the ratio of ingredients is closely controlled.

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              • #8
                Re: Compressing Bio-gas

                Multiple landfills are operable across USA that are converting Landfill Gas (LFG) to either CNG or LNG. Yes the LFG is wet and has other undesirable gases, but those hurdles can be overcome.

                Here are just a few success stories for BioGas conversion to either cng or lng:
                Columbus, OH - - - landfill CNG
                http://www.greencarcongress.com/2005...andfill_g.html
                http://www.ngvglobal.com/landfill-so...s-in-ohio-0916

                Livermore, CA - - - landfill CNG
                http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-10390556-54.html

                Franklin County, CO - - - landfill gas(LFG) to LNG
                http://www.afdc.energy.gov/pdfs/landfillreportfinal.pdf

                Department of Energy info on Renewable Natural Gas (BioGas)
                http://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/emerging_biogas.html

                Methane from manure at dairy farms or stockyards can also be harvested to CNG, just as OP was questioned by Nebraska farmer:
                Fair Oaks, IN - - - dairy farm methane to power tractor trucks delivering milk
                http://bulktransporter.com/mag/trans...ks_farms-0901/
                Last edited by KSneedsCNG; 03-11-2013, 07:58 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Compressing Bio-gas

                  On our cross country CNG road trip (see Day 9 at CNGTravels.me), we fueled at a biomass facility, quasar energy group in Columbus, OH. We were also given a tour of the facility, and shown the process by which they clean the resulting product to produce CNG for fueling purposes.

                  I think our gracious tour guides would welcome serious inquiries:

                  Jerry Hutton
                  Director, Gaseous Fuels
                  Clean Fuels Ohio
                  Jerry@CleanFuelsOhio.org

                  Aleksandr Yakhnitskiy
                  Plant Engineer
                  ayakhnitskiy@quasarenergygroup.com
                  White '09 GX

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Compressing Bio-gas

                    As for wich manure is the best, heres my take: hog confinement 1 do to already handling the waste just diverting to digesters instead of holding ponds, cattle feed lots same reason, chicken not so good for the labor needed to collect and very hard to process, high in amonia content. The digester get set for what they are going to run the anticpated waste and amount. Dairy farms are good also better at co generation for electricity first then CNG.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Compressing Bio-gas

                      Going back to my days 20+ years ago as a trainer and tech support for an Impco dealer, the gas valves Impco used in their mechanical mixers were quite a bit richer than standard NG gas valves due to the lower btu content of digester gas. Horsepower was also quite a bit lower too, somewhere around 60% that of pipeline natural gas. I think the mechanics of collecting, preparing the product before outgassing, compressing and storing, would come pretty close to offsetting any dollar gain from the product. If it were used on a farm where the product were normally just outgassing and collecting it from landfills without compression, I think it might be cost effective.

                      Franz
                      Last edited by Franz; 03-11-2013, 04:26 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        South San Francisco facility to Produce CNG Fuel from Organic Waste

                        ...Blue Line Biogenic CNG facility will convert 11,200 tons per year of food and green waste into 100,000+ DGE of CNG fuel annually. It is estimated that each collection vehicle will collect enough organic waste during just one route to fuel it for an entire day.

                        The Blue Line Biogenic CNG Facility will be developed in a partnership with Blue Line Transfer Inc., South San Francisco Scavenger Co. Inc. and Zero Waste Energy (ZWE). The project will include SMARTFERM anaerobic digestion technology. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in the second quarter of 2014.

                        "SMARTFERM will give us the ability to reduce the organics going into the landfill by converting that same waste into CNG fuel to power our collection routes," says Doug Button, president of South San Francisco Scavenger.

                        NGT News Nov 08, 2013

                        http://www.ngtnews.com/e107_plugins/...2#.Uot--5ETvD0
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                        • #13
                          Biogas digester operator training class 6-8 Feb 2017 includes tours of Blue Line Biogenic CNG 500 E Jamie Ct South San Francisco CA; Zero Waste Energy Devl Co 685 Los Esteros Road San Jose, CA; and at East Bay Municipal Utility District 2020 Wake Ave Oakland CA:

                          http://www.americanbiogascouncil.org...aining2018.asp


                          American Biogas Council | 1211 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036-2725 | 202-640-6595 | info@americanbiogascouncil.org
                          .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This thread is rather old, so I'm very late to the party. More for those subsequently falling over this thread, we have a Brit solving the issues, see: http://biomethane.co.uk/
                            Last edited by BritCNGUser; 06-16-2018, 01:41 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Betsy Lillian May 25 2018 for NGT News - At its South Treatment Plant in Renton, King County (Seattle), Wash., is reaping the benefits of purifying biogas into renewable natural gas (RNG) for use by commercial vehicles.

                              According to a press release from the county, RNG sales yielded more than $6 million in revenue for King County s Wastewater Treatment Division in 2017. We are demonstrating to the rest of the country how local governments can work together to build a sustainable, clean energy economy, says Dow Constantine, King County executive.

                              Clean Energy is currently delivering the RNG to its Washington fueling station network. Clean Energy s five stations fuel about 1.5 million gallons of RNG annually, sourced from this local production facility. One of the largest local end-users is Recology, an employee-owned waste management company that uses the RNG for its garbage trucks. Kevin Kelly is general manager for Recology in King County.

                              King County claims it has been purifying and selling RNG from its South Treatment Plant for longer than any other wastewater facility in the country. Each year, the volume of RNG produced at the plant is the energy equivalent of about 1.7 million gallons of diesel fuel. King County notes that its Cedar Hills Regional Landfill in Maple Valley is also a large producer of RNG.

                              https://ngtnews.com/king-countys-bio...News+Headlines
                              .

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