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  • Re: diesel - CNG

    Originally posted by altfuel View Post
    I own a Civic GX and a Duramax Diesel truck. I am looking into converting the truck to run on 50%+ CNG / Diesel mix. If anyone has any information or experience in this please post or email me.

    Thanks,
    Alex
    I wrote an article that you might find useful: Diesel Dual Fuel Systems. Ideally, CNG supply to a diesel should be controlled by a fuel map (RPM & boost pressure). As CNG MOTORS reported earlier, more CNG can be substituted at low loads but should be cut back as loads increase. Because of fuel transport delay control-issues, CNG should be ideally introduced near the intake manifold (post intercooler) rather than pre-turbo.

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    • Re: diesel - CNG

      just read the whole thread from beginning. Great posts all the way through. I went from transporting campers with a P/U to an early 90's Isuzu FTR w/ 26' flatbed to transport TWO trailers. I get 7 MPG while loaded (1 trailer on top, 1 behind)and about 9.75MPG empty which is not very often. I was going to haul w/10-car truck, but lost out of WIA funding for CDL-A schooling. My truck is under CDL. I'll be looking into a CNG booster like DeLuca and others sell/install for MPG gains. Its good to see CNG prices dropped in last couple of years.
      I had thought that with my need for extended range CNG would have facilitated LNG stations to be more widespread and was therefore depressed upon finding the new LNG/CNG facility in SLC was geared towards extended range CNG (not LNG like heavy-duty use at the ports) Since I'll be driving from ELkhart, In and can get CNG going N.W. until I leave Minn. But remarkably, when driving through N.D. (Bakken and Williston-Basin area) there are zero CNG stations yet. Same along my routes to N.W. Washington. Hopefully this will change in the coming months as we get closer to $5/gallon dino fuels

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      • Re: diesel - CNG

        Started my new project this weak an International 4700 with the smaller DT444 engine. On straight diesel and no load we saw 15mpg out of this truck. If this works like our 4900 truck then we should see 30 mpg on this 15k lbs truck.
        sigpichttp://WWW.CNGMOTORS.COM
        SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY. SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT.

        2003 Hummer H2 bi-fuel
        2000 GMC Yukon XL bi-fuel
        1999 International 4700 dual-fuel
        2007 Chevy Avalanche bi-fuel

        FMQ2-36 Fuelmaker w/ 24 GGE cascade

        Comment


        • Re: diesel - CNG

          I just recently have been thinking of one of these diesel conversions. My F150 bifuel doesn't quite have the power that I'm looking for to tow my boat up some of the steep hills here in Utah. I have a couple of questions regarding this conversion.
          One is- what is the average price of this conversion? Two is- is there a tax credit for this type of conversion? Three is- I recently saw a diesel conversion kit on KSL classifieds. It looks like a do-it-yourself conversion. Is this legal to do on my own? Also, does anyone have any experience with it? Here is the link: http://www.ewsews.com/cngprices.html
          Thanks, Mike

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          • Re: diesel - CNG

            Originally posted by parmport View Post
            I just recently have been thinking of one of these diesel conversions. My F150 bifuel doesn't quite have the power that I'm looking for to tow my boat up some of the steep hills here in Utah. I have a couple of questions regarding this conversion.
            One is- what is the average price of this conversion? Two is- is there a tax credit for this type of conversion? Three is- I recently saw a diesel conversion kit on KSL classifieds. It looks like a do-it-yourself conversion. Is this legal to do on my own?
            In some cities the local DMV is less restrictive with DIY engine swaps and alternative fuels conversions, but check it carefully before start to turn any screw. BTW for the diesel-CNG setup which engine are you considering? Or if you would still want a dedicated-CNG you could even considered a Cummins-Westport CNG engine. Being based on a heavy-duty diesel its torque range is quite impressive, and could last longer than a gasser-based because diesel blocks are usually beefier. Also it would have a compression optimized to the CNG.

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            • Re: diesel - CNG

              I'm new to the thread and have a couple of questions.
              I am part of a farming operation and we are looking into adding CNG to our 4 Dodges, 4 John Deere tractors, and 2 Freightliners. We have multiple wells to put CNG pumps on but are looking for all the facts before investing the money.
              If this CNG is introduced into the air intake on a dodge cummins is the grid heater going to have to be removed or be able to be shut off to prevent the CNG from igniting in the intake elbow?
              Does the introduction CNG happen before or after the turbocharger.

              Thanks, Aubrey

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              • Re: diesel - CNG

                I realize that I'm a little off topic, but since I'm a new user I can't start a new topic and am a bit desperate for info... Been searching for a while on this question and can't find solid answers.

                What's the feasibility / value of converting from CNG to LP? I'm looking at a '97 Ford E250 van that was factory built to run on CNG and since CNG is hard to find in my area I was wondering if it can be converted to LP. I know LP is lower pressure than CNG and that I'd have to change the filler cap, but beyond that I'm in the dark. Has anyone ever done this and if so, did it work?

                Again, apologies for posting in the wrong thread... :P

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                • Re: diesel - CNG

                  It's like changing unleaded to diesel or vise versa. Non of the componets are interchangeable. You might aswell start with a regular gasser and covert it at least that way you save the labor of ripping out the old system
                  sigpichttp://WWW.CNGMOTORS.COM
                  SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY. SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT.

                  2003 Hummer H2 bi-fuel
                  2000 GMC Yukon XL bi-fuel
                  1999 International 4700 dual-fuel
                  2007 Chevy Avalanche bi-fuel

                  FMQ2-36 Fuelmaker w/ 24 GGE cascade

                  Comment


                  • Re: diesel - CNG

                    If you could find the GFI wiring diagrams, you might be able to swap out the CNG compuvale for an LP compuvalve. Be sure to check fuel nozzles in the intake manifold. You would have to change out the pressure regulator and fuel lines up to the compuvalve. The unknown would be the interface with the OEM Ford computer.

                    Thats my best take, hope this helps

                    Larrycng

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                    • Re: diesel - CNG

                      bronzebogen:

                      If you are in southern Oregon, there are 2 public CNG fueling facilities in Medford.
                      See www.cngprices.com

                      If not, search around the web for a used CNG home fueler. This would be a whole ton
                      less cost and hassle than even thinking of having an existing vehicle converted, should you aquire the Ford van or similar vehicle.

                      You could also check with the FuelMaker rep for Oregon.
                      '13 Chev Silverado 2500 Ext Cab Factory Bi-Fuel
                      '08 Green Tea Metallic GX
                      FMQ-2-36 Fueler

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                      • Re: diesel - CNG

                        Anyone familiar with the Prins "Diesel Blend" or Technocarb "Eco Diesel" dual fuel conversions? From the information I have read on the web (not a lot) it doesn't appear that either has attempted to get EPA certification for any specific applications. The natural gas act appears to support Dual fuel conversions on the incremental cost but I assume that would require a EPA (CARB) certified conversion to qualify. Looking at replacing a vehicle (gas or diesel) soon and want to pursue CNG for fuel savings once (if?) the natural gas act becomes law and is enacted...

                        TWH_MN

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                        • Re: diesel - CNG

                          Quote: They can't figure out why the motors are blowing... anyone have an idea?

                          yes!
                          All fuels self-ignite when they are compressed beyond a certain compression ratio. This is what determines the fuel's octane number. Diesel engines are designed with compression ratios of the order of 1:22 or thereabouts (depending upon the manufacturer and the quality of fuel to be used), (Petrol engines can have Compression ratios of the order of 1:9 to almost 1:10.5).
                          The biofuels are made from almost any bio garbage, and the octane number just simply varies.
                          In the experiment quoted, the bio-fuel used might be having a lower octane number, hence it ignites pre-maturedly while the piston is still in the upstroke. Thus breaking up the engine.

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                          • Re: diesel - CNG

                            What kills a cng/diesel blend motor are EGT's. If you don't control it, it's like a time bomb waiting to go off. We have almost 1million miles between several cng/blend trucks with ZERO issues. Duramax, cummins, powerstroke, and detriot.
                            sigpichttp://WWW.CNGMOTORS.COM
                            SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY. SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT.

                            2003 Hummer H2 bi-fuel
                            2000 GMC Yukon XL bi-fuel
                            1999 International 4700 dual-fuel
                            2007 Chevy Avalanche bi-fuel

                            FMQ2-36 Fuelmaker w/ 24 GGE cascade

                            Comment


                            • Re: diesel - CNG

                              Originally posted by micrologics View Post
                              Quote: They can't figure out why the motors are blowing... anyone have an idea?

                              yes!
                              All fuels self-ignite when they are compressed beyond a certain compression ratio. This is what determines the fuel's octane number. Diesel engines are designed with compression ratios of the order of 1:22 or thereabouts (depending upon the manufacturer and the quality of fuel to be used), (Petrol engines can have Compression ratios of the order of 1:9 to almost 1:10.5).
                              The biofuels are made from almost any bio garbage, and the octane number just simply varies.
                              In the experiment quoted, the bio-fuel used might be having a lower octane number, hence it ignites pre-maturedly while the piston is still in the upstroke. Thus breaking up the engine.
                              a diesel can not pre ignite with bio fuel as there is no fuel in the cylinder during compression now cng when interduced into the air stream can cause pre ign. but methane has a high octane not so with butane ethane propane and such but just remember heat is the problem no mater what the fuel

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                              • Re: diesel - CNG

                                I have been thinking about adding CNG to my 6.7L Ford Diesel. Has anyone tried fumigating one of these? It has multi-injections per engine cycle and I was wondering if fumigation would hurt it.

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