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The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

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  • The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

    Further to my thread on this I've now found this press-pack, tells all

    850BiFuelPressKit.pdf



    Volvo850.jpg


    And a road-test:


    I quote:

    Our fuel gauge is indicating we're at the quarter-tank level, so we head for the station to fill up. A quick swipe of the debit card, a moment to hook up the pressure-fit connection, and we're just seconds from being back on the road. Wait a minute...the pressure-fit connection? Oh, yeah. There's one detail we left out: We're driving a bi-fuel Volvo 850 wagon, and right now we're fueling up with compressed natural gas (CNG). We had spent the first 100 or so miles of our 220-mile journey driving uneventfully on this alternative fuel before noticing we were down to one green LED on the center console display, a concession to the developmental nature of this prototype. We flicked a rocker switch next to the solitary LED to change over to gasoline until the fill-up; if the CNG supply had run out, the changeover would have taken place automatically. A fuel gauge in the instrument cluster told us we still had plenty of gasoline left. In fact, with the Volvo's standard 19.3-gallon gas tank and the 60-liter CNG cylinder secreted within an enclosure behind the rear seat, we could have driven almost another 300 miles. The Volvo's performance and road manners didn't vary as we switched back and forth between fuels at freeway speeds, but a difference could be felt when accelerating from a stoplight because of the 14-horsepower drop running on CNG. Even so, this car still has plenty of power on tap for merging onto interstates and handling everyday driving needs. Our test car was one of 20 early versions of Volvo's bi-fuel 850 that were built in Sweden and shipped to the U.S. for testing in the automaker's employee fleet. Production successors of the now revised and renamed 850 line (the new S70 and V70 models) should go on sale in Europe about the time you're reading this and will have received some important upgrades, including a larger and lighter composite overwrapped aluminum CNG cylinder. This replaces the much heavier steel cylinder used in these bi-fuel prototypes, decreasing curb weight and extending driving range on natural gas by about 20 percent. An optimized engine-management computer, a unique catalyst, and integral CNG/gasoline and fuel level gauges also will be included. Additionally, instead of being converted to run on natural gas after it's built, the latest versions will come off the assembly line. Will these clean-burning bi-fuel cars be sold here in the States? Volvo isn't saying. But with the commercialization of natural gas vehicles for fleets proceeding apace by other automakers, it's a likely scenario.

    Read more: http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/...#ixzz3AjwBSmzz
    Last edited by Curtis; 08-25-2014, 02:53 PM.

  • #2
    Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

    it will have the wrong kinda headlights or some other bs reason it cant be imported. the American public is screwed.

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    • #3
      Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

      Yep . . . some "reason" prevented any sales in USA as this was 1997 edition of MotorTrend !!!!

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      • #4
        Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

        Easy Cowboy, the U.S. knows more about cars than any other country??? If you've been in trucking as long as I think you should know about FMVSS 121. There are federal regulations specifying equipment in title 49 CFR starting with section 500 I believe. You may also be familiar with section 571.304. As much as I think it is a pain in the "differential", I am glad we have them.

        Larry

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        • #5
          Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

          Originally posted by larrycng View Post
          Easy Cowboy, the U.S. knows more about cars than any other country??? If you've been in trucking as long as I think you should know about FMVSS 121. There are federal regulations specifying equipment in title 49 CFR starting with section 500 I believe. You may also be familiar with section 571.304. larry
          As much as I think it is a pain in the "differential", I am glad we have them. yep we had to change the lights in a car form France a few years back because it did not have a little dot stamp on the good glass light and we had to change it to plastic with the little dot stamp on it for the life of me I cant remember the name of it but it was something that was sold here. but to get the import bond back had to put the epa crap on and change the lights and some other stuff and we all know that the cheap plastic lights get fogged in a few years. nobody changes them out unless they are broken so with better plastic lights (yea right) we end up with cars that cant see at night I sure am glad my government is going to save me from those bad ol good glass headlights.it was a gasoline car so I can go along with the epa crap but the lights were just stupid. and as far as usa knowing more about cars I hope you are joking when I travel I have driven cars that got 80 +mpg and did a fine job of getting me from there to tither. the truck law starts at 390 something I think right after trains
          Last edited by John Mitton; 08-20-2014, 09:44 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

            Yes, perhaps I should have said this was the first 'production' CNG car in the world and date it, I think the US got press-demonstrators, I'm pretty sure the US didn't get the thing onto the local Volvo Dealer forecourt. But you did get Volvo 850 cars running petrol or derv.

            the U.S. knows more about cars than any other country???
            Not entirely convinced here but send any 50s Caddy or late 60s Yank muscle round this minute and it'll be me striking-up the 'Star Spangled Banner'
            Last edited by BritCNGUser; 01-26-2016, 04:54 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.

              Interestingly enough, the first cars to run on gaseous fuel occurred around WW I, when gasoline was unavailable due to the war effort. The gas, or Erdgas, as it was called, was stored in a bag above the vehicle. Erdgas was made from smoking wood (gasifying.) See this article to learn more:

              Gas Bag Vehicles

              were not the only answer to the limited supply of gasoline in World War One and Two. An even more cumbersome alternative came in the form of the gas bag vehicle.
              The old-timers on these pictures are not moving furniture or an oversized load. What can be seen on the roof is the fuel tank of the vehicle - a balloon filled with uncompressed gas.

              ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Gas bag vehicles were built during World War One and (especially) World War Two in France, the Netherlands, Germany and England as an improvised solution to the shortage of gasoline. Apart from automobiles, buses and trucks were also equipped with the technology. The vehicles consumed 'town gas' or 'street gas', a by-product of the process of turning coal into cokes (which are used to make iron).


              Today, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are quite practical. The fuel tank needs to be roughly twice as big as a gasoline fuel tank in order to get the same range. But the fuel used for gas bag vehicles during the World Wars was generally not compressed and had a much lower energy density than LPG or CNG. To replace one litre of gasoline, two to three cubic metres of gas was needed.

              The only way to get a somewhat practical range, was to use an extremely large 'fuel tank'. Buses were better suited for this than automobiles - they had a full-length gas storage bag on a roof rack. It could be enclosed in a streamlined fairing but most often it was not.


              Private automobiles were equipped with a wooden framework which was fastened to the roof and the reinforced bumpers of the vehicle. It was hard to overlook a gas bag vehicle passing along.


              The Dutch old-timer on the pictures above carried a gas storage bag of 13 cubic metres, an installation that gave it a range of approximately 50 km (30 miles) at an energy consumption of 13 litres per km (22 mpg). The aerodynamics of gas bag automobiles were disastrous, so fuel economy was far from optimal.

              Easy repair
              Witnesses to the vehicle passing by could easily see how much fuel was left: the gas bag was fully inflated at the start of a trip, and it deflated with every mile that was driven.


              The gas storage bags were made of silk or other fabrics, soaked in rubber (Zodiac was one of the manufacturers). These bags were (and are) much cheaper and easier to build than metal tanks. They could also be repaired in a similar way to bicycle tyres. The bag was anchored to the roof using rings and straps. Some gas bag vehicles could operate alternatively on gas or gasoline. Switching between the two options could be controlled from inside the vehicle.
              Compressed gas
              Although it was technically possible to compress town gas or street gas, this did not happen because of two reasons. Carbon monoxide, one of the components of town gas and street gas, disintegrates quickly when compressed, while hydrogen gas, another component, leaks away through steel tanks when it is compressed.

              The only exception was the use of gas cylinders in France during World War Two (picture above), allowing for a smaller fuel tank or a better range. Natural gas was used in this case, which could be compressed without the drawbacks of compressing town gas. However, this configuration turned out to be more expensive and more dangerous.
              No smoking

              It will not surprise anyone that gas bag vehicles had their risks. One obvious risk was fire, which could cause a gas explosion. As a result, people waiting for the bus were urged not to smoke (See pictures: "Autobus-Haltestelle" = "bus stop" & "Rauchen verboten" = "smoking prohibited").

              Bridges
              Another risk were bridges and other overhead obstacles. The driver needed to know the exact height of his vehicle and of the bridges that he planned to drive underneath.
              Excessive speeds were not a good idea either. It was advised not to surpass a speed of 50 km/h (30 mph), not only to maintain a decent range but also to make sure that the fuel tank would not fly off the vehicle. Strong side winds could present hazardous situations, too. Gas bag vehicles also suffered from carburator fires, loud bangs and engine damage.

              Gas bag buses could still be seen in China in the 1990s, notably in the municipality of Chongqing where they were developed in peace time as a cheap public transportation option. The picture below (credit) shows at least six operating gas bag buses in Shawan ("Sandy Bay"), Shandong, China, in 1965.

              Kris De Decker. Edited by Deva Lee. Thanks to Dutch John.
              Sources:
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              • #8
                Re: The first production CNG car in World was this, and I think the US got a few.


                it will have the wrong kinda headlights or some other bs reason it cant be imported. the American public is screwed.
                Somebody sits on a few of these somewhere in the US, or did. On reading that 1996 press-pack Volvo US-staffers got these, and what would have happened to them after that? OK, agreed... by now it's a bomb!
                but tanks aside, they're good for 300,000+ (my last had 380 on it before it let go) so one could well be sitting on a used lot near you. Here's a UK cutting form 1999...
                Volvo Powershift Grants.jpg

                We got about the same number as you. Lots went into Sweden, Italy and Germany.
                Last edited by BritCNGUser; 04-07-2015, 04:50 PM.

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