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  • 300mileclub
    replied
    Haydn Watters for CBC News July 7 2019 - Wade Anderson hopes to cover 32 states, 5 provinces and territories in 2 months

    The Tucson AZ man is three weeks into a road trip around the continent in his electric car, a Tesla Model 3. Along the way, he will be attempting to get to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, the northernmost point you can drive to in the U.S. To get there, he will head through Canada. He is still figuring out how charging will work that far north.

    I am just going on a journey, he said at a pit stop in Woodstock, Ontario, 16 days into his trip. It is important to get out there and just live life and have these experiences.

    Superchargers give the fastest charge and the most range. A standard 120-volt outlet only gives about 8 km (4 mi) of range per hour of charging, not ideal given Anderson plans to drive more than 25,000 km (11K mi) in just two months. Whitehorse has a charger somewhere there but, after that, he does not know yet.

    This is far from his first adventure — he once rode a bike from Key West FL, to Alaska. He is a physiotherapist in Arizona, where he works six days a week for 10 months so he can take two months off to do this kind of trip.

    The journey takes him through 32 states and into five provinces and territories. I'm hoping to be done in two months. Anderson is driving alone, but has stopped to visit old friends and new ones — he meets up with people he discovers on Twitter at superchargers along the route. He has got multiple cameras strapped up inside his car so he can document his travels and post videos online.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamil...rica-1.5201763

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  • trdscfjc
    replied
    Bosch (8900$) and Delta (9999$) both have single phase DC fast chargers that work on single phase (25kw)
    Last edited by trdscfjc; 07-15-2017, 09:57 AM.

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  • 300mileclub
    replied
    Just, out of the blue, I typed Canada Mexico EV into a search engine and up pops a 2013 EV British Columbia to Baja California (BC2BC) trip. 41 hours driving time. 8 days. 321mi was the maximum covered in one day. drivers used their own adapter cord to plug into 240V at campgrounds. 110V only provides 15 miles of range per hour of charge. Vehicles making the run were Tesla S and Roadster, Zero S motorcycle, Leaf, RAV4 EV, and Mitsubishi i-MiEV.

    The planner of the road rally, Tony Williams, did the BC2BC trip solo, in 2012, in a Nissan Leaf.

    https://www.torquenews.com/1075/tiju...an-leaf-8-days

    http://www.plugincars.com/bc2bc-elec...ip-127684.html

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  • Adrian
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    I think the best current solution to an affordable and dependable EVSE is building one. See:http://code.google.com/p/open-evse/ . The cable and connector have also come down in price significantly; 30A and 15A versions are now under $150 : http://store.leviton.com/J1772-Charg...e/b/5742800011 .

    Leave a comment:


  • Adrian
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Originally posted by Adrian View Post
    I agree with siai47's answers, my experience has been pretty similar. My electricity cost is 14 cents/KWH, and I plug in for free at work, so my cost/mile is about half of his. I love driving the car; it is much more fun to drive than my wife's 08 Civic GX. I leased because the battery is an unknown variable to me. I'm glad I did lease as I already lost one capacity bar, which is a 15% loss after 25,000 miles. Yes, I sometimes use 120V charging. It's pretty similar to using a Phill to fuel a Civic GX; it works fine overnight depending on how many miles you drove that day.
    Update on my Nissan Leaf: After loosing my first capacity bar (15%) at 25k miles, my range continued to decrease, making my commute increasingly stressful. Leaf values also decreased following a class action suit being filed against Nissan for this issue. I was able to get out of the Leaf lease early with a minor cost and switched to leasing a Chevy Volt. So far, I have to say the Volt appears to be extremely well built and even more fun to drive than the Leaf. I am very disappointed with how badly Nissan is screwing up so far in dealing with their early adopters in regard to the battery capacity loss. I can only hope the class action lawsuit helps them change their perspective.

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  • KSneedsCNG
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    How about we pool resources/knowledge of cngchat members and begin manufacturing EV cables for this SAE J1772 mentioned above? Jobs and ingenuity here in USA!

    Since an entire electric 220 volt dryer can be bought for $375 which includes all wiring and 5 foot 220 volt plug, surely we could undercut the sky high cost of $375 "proprietary" plug mentioned above.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darkstarchuck
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    I stuck with Honda and now have 1K miles on our new Fit EV. Much more fun to drive than the Civic GX. Still in the process of getting the 240V 32A connection device (EVSE) A friend had a Mini Cooper Electric, so I'm getting his electronic controlled contactor. Unfortunately, the connector is not SAE J1772, so that connector with cable is EXPENSIVE. From the northern California manufacturer of the equipment, a replacement is $375 + tax and S&H. I'm waiting for 1 now. 1/2 the range of the Civic is not bad, but the cost of fuel is cheap!

    We charge now with the provided, 120V 12A connector. This would be OK, as the lease limits mileage to 36K in 3 years, which is waaaay too easy to get with the overnight slow charge, but don't drive it to near empty, and stay out till 10PM, and expect to see a full charge by 9am.

    Cowboy, Most of the costs to install these "Chargers" at the public locations involves getting enough power and the data from the building out to the parking lots where the cars are.
    Last edited by Darkstarchuck; 09-07-2012, 04:14 PM.

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  • KSneedsCNG
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Great information on the Leaf's economical operation if it's under 4 cents a mile with high cost electricity at 14 or 15 cents per Kw. Lots of area in country have electricity at 8 to 10 cents a Kw so cost per mile would drop down to maybe 3 cents a mile! Episode of This Old House had remodel of Barrington, RI ocean-front house with bunch of solar panels that were costing them 8 cents a Kw, net after state and Federal incentives. Solar panels were manufactured in Dallas, TX and cost dropped in half over last 4 years.

    Next step is to put large solar panels on buildings near where these EV's park and charge them for free with solar during the day! If no cars are there, then extra juice goes out to the grid.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adrian
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Originally posted by KSneedsCNG View Post
    Hey Adrian in California, how about giving us a Real World update on your first year owning Nissan Leaf electric car??

    What has been typical number of miles range on a charge, and how long to recharge battery on 240 volt?? Do you even mess with 120 volt recharging due to long time?

    As for cost, what is your best guess at Cost Per Mile of just electricity?
    I agree with siai47's answers, my experience has been pretty similar. My electricity cost is 14 cents/KWH, and I plug in for free at work, so my cost/mile is about half of his. I love driving the car; it is much more fun to drive than my wife's 08 Civic GX. I leased because the battery is an unknown variable to me. I'm glad I did lease as I already lost one capacity bar, which is a 15% loss after 25,000 miles. Yes, I sometimes use 120V charging. It's pretty similar to using a Phill to fuel a Civic GX; it works fine overnight depending on how many miles you drove that day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    I am involved with the working group for the CA PEV Collaborative and the pork you refer to is hardly pork. This is a developing industry. There has been much trial & error along the way developing best practices and models for communities to get PEV ready.

    A site may need old electrical systems updated, we have to develop training courses for the IBEW to learn how to install and maintain these EVSE's and, of course, we have 2 competing types of chargers fighting for the dominant spot in the market, along with many companies developing and marketing smart chargers that can be programed to only charge during off-peak hours, communicate with the grid and at some future date, allow your car to operate as a stand-by power supply.

    This is far more involved and complicated than the consumer is aware. I know, I'm in the middle of it all with Clean Cities and the Dept Of Energy, NETL & NREL. So, not so much pork as something we are all familiar with... an, as yet, lack of economy of scale, with the supply side of PEV's, or even the vehicles themselves.

    On the bright side, there may be grants and incentives available to assist consumers to transition to EV's and obtain home infrastructure. There will be significant maturing of battery tech over the next 3-5 years. Then costs will go down and cost parity for OEM offerings may not seem like such a distant reality.

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  • siai47
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Your mileage may vary. I have a LEAF and average between four to five miles driven for every Kilowatt of energy delivered by the battery. You would have to plug in your own electric rate but in my case in Florida (no time of use rate available) it is about 15.7 cents per KWH including taxes. There is some loss between the energy coming from the wall to charge the battery compared to what you get back out but it is pretty small (around 10%). In my case the cost per mile is running around 3.8 cents for the electricity to drive one mile. 75 miles is pretty much the practical limit for the LEAF at 100% charge. If you want more range, you need to slow down to around 40 miles per hour. Freeway speeds will get you only 60 miles or so on a full charge. The current LEAF only has 3.3 KW charger so from low battery to full is about six and a half hours. The 2013 LEAF will have a 6.6 KW charger that will cut the charging time in half. The next cheapest thing I have to drive is my CNG Cavalier which I drive when I need more range. The LEAF has worked out well for me as I use it in a urban enviornment and know it's limits. Although I am happy with the LEAF--there are some issues with it that are troubling. I leased mine and would (at this time) advise anyone looking for one to look at some of the very attractive leases being offered right now. You can check out www.mynissanleaf.com for more info

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  • KSneedsCNG
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Hey Adrian in California, how about giving us a Real World update on your first year owning Nissan Leaf electric car??

    What has been typical number of miles range on a charge, and how long to recharge battery on 240 volt?? Do you even mess with 120 volt recharging due to long time?

    As for cost, what is your best guess at Cost Per Mile of just electricity?

    Leave a comment:


  • Adrian
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Originally posted by cripple_rooster View Post


    The 440-volt one from Nissan.
    Actually the charger in this picture looks like the one in my garage; it's a 240 V Aerovironment unit. Note the connector; it's a J1772, confirming this is NOT a 440 V charger which is a DC unit using the CHAdeMO connector which is quite bit bigger. fyi, the socket on the right (when looking at front of car) on the Nissan Leaf is the J1772 , the larger socket on the left is the CHAdeMO, and it was an option for the 2011 model year Leafs.
    another picture of the Aeronvironment L2 charger: http://www.pluginamerica.org/accesso...onment-evse-rs
    picture of a quick DC L3 charger: (see bottom): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAdeMO
    Last edited by Curtis; 09-02-2012, 10:21 PM.

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  • cowboy
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Originally posted by siai47 View Post
    They are actually called EVSE's (electric vehicle service equipment). They are expensive, unnecessary, fancy switches that have a contactor inside to prevent you from plugging the vehicle charger into a recepticle that has power going through it. Most lawyers think you are too dumb to plug something in without electrocuting yourself. So for your protection, the switch that actually costs between $600 and $1000 is added to any place you need to charge your vehicle. Add to that cost the need to be able to charge you for "charging" along with wiring and installation and as Lakewood says "pork"---you can really run up the price. The quick chargers which actually are chargers, cost between 10 and 20 K and require a fairly robust 480 volt three phase circuit capable of providing 50 kilowatts of power. However, there is a squable over the type of connector to be used and the protocall for vehicle communication that will effectively slow or stop installation of these large chargers in the near term.
    this is my point if it was just a plugin of 240 than the protocall would not matter as it would be onboard and 50 kw is not that much power off the top of my head I am thinking about 210 amps at 240 single phase

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  • cripple_rooster
    replied
    Re: chargers for electric cars

    Originally posted by Lakewood90712 View Post
    The superfast "chargers" are costly. Have not seen one yet.


    The 440-volt one from Nissan.

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