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  • gasoline to ngas

    Ive come across some high-mileage research done by JB McBurney, who developed a carburetor that converts (steam cracks) gasoline into methane (Natural gas) using waste exhaust heat, water vapor, and a metal catalyst (~1 gallon gas + 2 gallons water = 5 "gallons" natural gas). It might have a few interesting applications to drastically increase range in bifuel and possibly cng dedicated systems, since most of the needed natural gas engine components are already in place. I think the probable advantage for us falls in the fact that gasoline hydrocarbons are much more concentrated than nat gas is, much like lng. This might be a way to bypass the big expensive pressure tanks that cng requires.
    Last edited by rtry9a; 01-23-2012, 03:20 PM.

  • #2
    Re: gasoline to ngas

    Interesting concept. Is there a URL we could look up?

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    • #3
      Re: gasoline to ngas

      Not even those HHO setups seem so strange...

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      • #4
        Re: gasoline to ngas

        http://freeenergynews.com/Directory/...ease031117.htm Follow the links for more detailed data. Here is a better one: http://www.teslatech.info/ttstore/re...2art/crack.htm
        Last edited by rtry9a; 01-23-2012, 03:22 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: gasoline to ngas

          Yeah I agree.And I am trying to find more about his current lab research.Didnt get much info.Do provide me link if you get one.
          Last edited by cnghal; 04-10-2012, 10:17 AM. Reason: Advertising in unrelated link

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          • #6
            Re: gasoline to ngas

            I know nothing about this except when something sounds too good to be true it merits a critical perspective.

            Your post at a casual glance would lead one to think you take one gallon of gasoline and end up with five GGE's of natural gas by doing this steam cracking process.

            Unless I am overlooking something a GGE is based on a volume of natural gas with the same btu's as a gallon of gasoline. So to claim you are getting five GGE's from a gallon of gasoline means JB McBurney has discovered how to extract five times more BTU's from the gasoline than it actually contains.

            Doesn't sound right to me.

            Assuming the energy content stays more or less the same as it was in its original gasoline form, the only benefit I can see of doing the gasoline to nat gas conversion would be to have a cleaner combustion process in the engine.

            Karl





            Originally posted by rtry9a View Post
            Ive come across some high-mileage research done by JB McBurney, who developed a carburetor that converts (steam cracks) gasoline into methane (Natural gas) using waste exhaust heat, water vapor, and a metal catalyst (~1 gallon gas + 2 gallons water = 5 "gallons" natural gas). It might have a few interesting applications to drastically increase range in bifuel and possibly cng dedicated systems, since most of the needed natural gas engine components are already in place. I think the probable advantage for us falls in the fact that gasoline hydrocarbons are much more concentrated than nat gas is, much like lng. This might be a way to bypass the big expensive pressure tanks that cng requires.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: gasoline to ngas

              Well, the average component measured in gasoling is Octane C8H16. If one of those was able to be broken down to CH4 (Methane) then there would be about 4:1 Methanes to Octane with some free carbon going to CO2 in the reaction process. The problem with gasoline is that there are so many hydrocarbon coumpounds that it does not all burn at the same efficiency, consumes a lot of O2 and makes waste heat in the process. Its not out of the realm of possibility, just another task scientists would need to look at. With the abundance of natural gas, the only benefit of converting gasoline into methane then burning it would be to avoid the high pressure storage for CNG. The cost of that is a lot of refining and modifying, could the process really take place with enough 'make-to-use' while driving?
              '11 Fusion Bi Fuel & FMQ2-36 VRA
              (Former owner '09 Civic GX)

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